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RFID-generated traceability for contaminated product recall in perishable food supply networks

Author

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  • Piramuthu, Selwyn
  • Farahani, Poorya
  • Grunow, Martin

Abstract

As perishable food supply networks become more complex, incidents of contamination in these supply networks have become fairly common. Added to this complexity is the fact that there have been long delays in identifying the contamination source in several such incidents. Even when the contamination source was identified, there have been cases where the ultimate destination of all contaminated products were not known with complete certainty due, in part, to dispersion in these supply networks. We study the recall dynamics in a three-stage perishable food supply network through three different visibility levels in the presence of contamination. Specifically, we consider allocation of liability among the different players in the perishable supply network based on the accuracy with which the contamination source is identified. We illustrate the significance of finer levels of granularity both upstream and downstream as well as determine appropriate visibility levels and recall policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Piramuthu, Selwyn & Farahani, Poorya & Grunow, Martin, 2013. "RFID-generated traceability for contaminated product recall in perishable food supply networks," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 225(2), pages 253-262.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ejores:v:225:y:2013:i:2:p:253-262
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ejor.2012.09.024
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Piramuthu, Selwyn, 2005. "Knowledge-based framework for automated dynamic supply chain configuration," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 165(1), pages 219-230, August.
    2. Zhou, Wei, 2009. "RFID and item-level information visibility," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 198(1), pages 252-258, October.
    3. Fritz, Melanie & Schiefer, Gerhard, 2009. "Tracking, tracing, and business process interests in food commodities: A multi-level decision complexity," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(2), pages 317-329, February.
    4. Loader, Rupert & Hobbs, Jill E., 1999. "Strategic responses to food safety legislation," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 685-706, December.
    5. Rong, Aiying & Akkerman, Renzo & Grunow, Martin, 2011. "An optimization approach for managing fresh food quality throughout the supply chain," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(1), pages 421-429, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ahmed Musa & Al-Amin Abba Dabo, 2016. "A Review of RFID in Supply Chain Management: 2000–2015," Global Journal of Flexible Systems Management, Springer;Global Institute of Flexible Systems Management, vol. 17(2), pages 189-228, June.
    2. Grunow, Martin & Piramuthu, Selwyn, 2013. "RFID in highly perishable food supply chains – Remaining shelf life to supplant expiry date?," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 146(2), pages 717-727.
    3. Dulebenets, Maxim A. & Ozguven, Eren Erman, 2017. "Vessel scheduling in liner shipping: Modeling transport of perishable assets," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 184(C), pages 141-156.
    4. Williams, Brent D. & Waller, Matthew A. & Ahire, Sanjay & Ferrier, Gary D., 2014. "Predicting retailer orders with POS and order data: The inventory balance effect," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 232(3), pages 593-600.
    5. Chebolu-Subramanian, Vijaya & Gaukler, Gary M., 2015. "Product contamination in a multi-stage food supply chain," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 244(1), pages 164-175.
    6. Aiello, Giuseppe & Enea, Mario & Muriana, Cinzia, 2015. "The expected value of the traceability information," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 244(1), pages 176-186.
    7. Piramuthu, Selwyn & Wochner, Sina & Grunow, Martin, 2014. "Should retail stores also RFID-tag ‘cheap’ items?," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 233(1), pages 281-291.

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