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A prospect-theoretical interpretation of momentum returns

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  • Menkhoff, Lukas
  • Schmeling, Maik

Abstract

The puzzling evidence of seemingly high momentum returns is related to an understanding of risk as a simple covariance. If we consider, however, risk in higher-order statistical moments, momentum returns appear less advantageous. Thus, a prospect-theoretical assessment of US stock momentum returns provides a possible direction for explaining this puzzle.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Menkhoff, Lukas & Schmeling, Maik, 2006. "A prospect-theoretical interpretation of momentum returns," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 93(3), pages 360-366, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:93:y:2006:i:3:p:360-366
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    Cited by:

    1. Gregory-Allen, Russell & Lu, Helen & Stork, Philip, 2012. "Asymmetric extreme tails and prospective utility of momentum returns," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(1), pages 295-297.
    2. Mouna Abdelhédi-Zouch & Mouna Boujelbène Abbes & Younès Boujelbène, 2015. "Volatility Spillover And Investor Sentiment: Subprime Crisis," Asian Academy of Management Journal of Accounting and Finance (AAMJAF), Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia, vol. 11(2), pages 83-101.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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