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The timing and division of parental transfers to children

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  • Dunn, Thomas A.
  • Phillips, John W.

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  • Dunn, Thomas A. & Phillips, John W., 1997. "The timing and division of parental transfers to children," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 135-137, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:54:y:1997:i:2:p:135-137
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joseph G. Altonji & Fumio Hayashi & Laurence Kotlikoff, "undated". "The Effects of Income and Wealth on Time and MOney Transfers Between Parents and Children," IPR working papers 96-5, Institute for Policy Resarch at Northwestern University.
    2. Wilhelm, Mark O, 1996. "Bequest Behavior and the Effect of Heirs' Earnings: Testing the Altruistic Model of Bequests," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 874-892, September.
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