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Sen cycles and externalities

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Listed:
  • Piggins, Ashley
  • Salerno, Gillian

Abstract

Sen’s (1970) theorem on the impossibility of a Paretian liberal depends on the presence of externalities. Saari and Petron (2006) show that for any Sen cycle, every decisive individual suffers at least one strong negative externality. We show that this result only holds when individual preferences are strict. We prove a general theorem for the case of weak preferences.

Suggested Citation

  • Piggins, Ashley & Salerno, Gillian, 2016. "Sen cycles and externalities," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 25-27.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:149:y:2016:i:c:p:25-27
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2016.10.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sen, Amartya Kumar, 1970. "The Impossibility of a Paretian Liberal," Scholarly Articles 3612779, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    2. Sen, Amartya, 1970. "The Impossibility of a Paretian Liberal," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 78(1), pages 152-157, Jan.-Feb..
    3. Anne Pétron & Donald Saari, 2006. "Negative externalities and Sen's liberalism thorem," Post-Print halshs-00094539, HAL.
    4. Mathias Risse, 2001. "What to Make of the Liberal Paradox?," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 50(2), pages 169-196, March.
    5. Campbell, Donald E & Kelly, Jerry S, 1997. "Sen's Theorem and Externalities," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(255), pages 375-386, August.
    6. Franz Dietrich & Christian List, 2008. "A liberal paradox for judgment aggregation," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 31(1), pages 59-78, June.
    7. Donald Saari & Anne Petron, 2006. "Negative externalities and Sen’s liberalism theorem," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 28(2), pages 265-281, June.
    8. Sugden, Robert, 1985. "Liberty, Preference, and Choice," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(02), pages 213-229, October.
    9. Lingfang (Ivy) Li & Donald Saari, 2008. "Sen’s theorem: geometric proof, new interpretations," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 31(3), pages 393-413, October.
    10. Gaertner, Wulf & Pattanaik, Prasanta K & Suzumura, Kotaro, 1992. "Individual Rights Revisited," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 59(234), pages 161-177, May.
    11. Suzumura, Kotaro, 2011. "Chapter Twenty-Three - Welfarism, Individual Rights, and Procedural Fairness," Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare,in: K. J. Arrow & A. K. Sen & K. Suzumura (ed.), Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 23, pages 605-685 Elsevier.
    12. Maurice Salles, 2008. "Limited Rights as Partial Veto and Sen's Impossibility Theorem," Post-Print halshs-00337094, HAL.
    13. Julian H. Blau, 1975. "Liberal Values and Independence," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(3), pages 395-401.
    14. Saari,Donald G., 2008. "Disposing Dictators, Demystifying Voting Paradoxes," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521516051, August.
    15. Peter Bernholz, 1982. "Externalities as a Necessary Condition for Cyclical Social Preferences," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 97(4), pages 699-705.
    16. Saari,Donald G., 2008. "Disposing Dictators, Demystifying Voting Paradoxes," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521731607, August.
    17. Donald Saari, 2011. "Source of complexity in the social and managerial sciences: an extended Sen’s theorem," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 37(4), pages 609-620, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sen’s impossibility theorem; Liberal paradox; Saari–Petron theorem; Externalities; Social preference cycles;

    JEL classification:

    • D71 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Social Choice; Clubs; Committees; Associations

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