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Can government spending increase private consumption? The role of complementarity

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  • Ganelli, Giovanni
  • Tervala, Juha

Abstract

It is empirically observed that private consumption responds positively to fiscal shocks. We offer an explanation for this stylized fact, based on the idea of complementarity between public and private consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Ganelli, Giovanni & Tervala, Juha, 2009. "Can government spending increase private consumption? The role of complementarity," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 5-7, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:103:y:2009:i:1:p:5-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Baxter, Marianne & King, Robert G, 1993. "Fiscal Policy in General Equilibrium," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 315-334, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Juha Tervala, 2009. "Productive government spending and private consumption: a pessimistic view," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(1), pages 416-425.
    2. Erauskin, Iñaki, 2013. "The impact of financial openness on the size of utility-enhancing government," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 7, pages 1-56.
    3. Luigi Marattin & Arsen Palestini, 2014. "Government spending under non-separability: a theoretical analysis," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 61(1), pages 39-60, April.
    4. Anna Kormilitsina & Sarah Zubairy, 2015. "Propagation Mechanisms for Government Spending Shocks: A Bayesian Comparison," EcoMod2015 8646, EcoMod.
    5. Erauskin, Iñaki, 2015. "The net foreign asset position and government size," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 130-148.
    6. Lecca, Patrizio & McGregor, Peter G. & Swales, J. Kim, 2010. "Balanced Budget Government Spending in a Small Open Regional Economy," SIRE Discussion Papers 2010-68, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    7. MATSUMAE Tatsuyoshi & HASUMI Ryo, 2016. "Impacts of Government Spending on Unemployment: Evidence from a Medium-scale DSGE Model(in Japanese)," ESRI Discussion paper series 329, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    8. Soldatos, Gerasimos T., 2014. "Local Taxation, Private-Public Consumption Complementarity, and the Optimal Number of Jurisdictions," MPRA Paper 60861, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Go Kotera & Saisuke Sakai, 2017. "Complementarity between Merit Goods and Private Consumption: Evidence from estimated DSGE model for Japan," KIER Working Papers 978, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    10. Okano, Eiji, 2014. "How important is fiscal policy cooperation in a currency union?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 266-286.
    11. Fève, Patrick & Matheron, Julien & Sahuc, Jean-Guillaume, 2011. "Externality in labor supply and government spending," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 112(3), pages 273-276, September.
    12. Luigi Marattin & Simone Salotti, 2014. "Consumption multipliers of different types of public spending: a structural vector error correction analysis for the UK," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(4), pages 1197-1220, June.
    13. Martin Slanicay & Jan Čapek & Miroslav Hloušek, 2016. "Some Notes On Problematic Issues In Dsge Models," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 61(210), pages 79-100, July - Se.
    14. Iwata, Yasuharu, 2013. "Two fiscal policy puzzles revisited: New evidence and an explanation," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 188-207.
    15. Khalid Khan & Chen FEI & Muhammad Abdul Kamal & Badar Nadeem Ashraf, 2015. "Impact of Government Spending on Private Consumption Using ARDL Approach," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(2), pages 239-248, February.
    16. Barbara Annicchiarico & Claudio Battiati & Claudio Cesaroni & Fabio Di Dio & Francesco Felici, 2017. "IGEM-PA: a Variant of the Italian General Equilibrium Model for Policy Analysis," Working Papers 2, Department of the Treasury, Ministry of the Economy and of Finance.
    17. Funashima, Yoshito, 2014. "A Comprehensive Analysis of the Response of Private Consumption to Government Spending," MPRA Paper 59968, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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