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Darwinian coevolution of organizations and the environment

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  • Hodgson, Geoffrey M.

Abstract

Darwinism offers a highly abstract and general meta-theoretical framework to help understand both natural and social evolution. This framework is of significance for ecological economics because it addresses the evolution and coevolution of biological systems and sets of human institutions. This paper outlines this framework and charts its historical origins since the time of Darwin. It is suggested that this over-arching framework is useful for ecological economics as a common meta-narrative within which more detailed examinations of both institutional and ecological mechanisms may be placed. Applying Darwinism in this manner does not mean that institutions or organizations are explained in purely biological terms: it means that Darwinian principles are not confined to biology.

Suggested Citation

  • Hodgson, Geoffrey M., 2010. "Darwinian coevolution of organizations and the environment," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(4), pages 700-706, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:69:y:2010:i:4:p:700-706
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Castro e Silva, Manuela & Teixeira, Aurora A.C., 2011. "A bibliometric account of the evolution of EE in the last two decades: Is ecological economics (becoming) a post-normal science?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(5), pages 849-862, March.
    2. Moreno-Peñaranda, Raquel & Kallis, Giorgos, 2010. "A coevolutionary understanding of agroenvironmental change: A case-study of a rural community in Brazil," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(4), pages 770-778, February.
    3. Gianpaolo Abatecola & Fiorenza Belussi & Dermot Breslin & Igor Filatotchev, 2016. "Darwinism, organizational evolution and survival: key challenges for future research," Journal of Management & Governance, Springer;Accademia Italiana di Economia Aziendale (AIDEA), vol. 20(1), pages 1-17, March.
    4. Kallis, Giorgos & Norgaard, Richard B., 2010. "Coevolutionary ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(4), pages 690-699, February.
    5. Chang, Rui-Dong & Zuo, Jian & Zhao, Zhen-Yu & Zillante, George & Gan, Xiao-Long & Soebarto, Veronica, 2017. "Evolving theories of sustainability and firms: History, future directions and implications for renewable energy research," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 48-56.
    6. Foxon, Timothy J., 2011. "A coevolutionary framework for analysing a transition to a sustainable low carbon economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(12), pages 2258-2267.

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