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Pollution without subsidy? What is the environmental performance index overlooking?

  • Atici, Cemal
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    Agriculture is heavily subsidized in most Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, and environmental externalities can occur due to pollution caused by protectionist policies. This study examines the structure of agricultural protection in OECD countries from a chronological and comparative perspective. In addition, the policy-environment interaction is scrutinized to better explain the environmental implications of agricultural policies in the era of globalization. This paper critically evaluates the environmental performance index and recommends that this index includes polluting inputs in future calculations.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VDY-4W09CHP-2/2/139e9e95b1bf161a42b1e6f25c94a7ba
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

    Volume (Year): 68 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 7 (May)
    Pages: 1903-1907

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:68:y:2009:i:7:p:1903-1907
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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    1. Jeffrey A. Frankel & Andrew K. Rose, 2005. "Is Trade Good or Bad for the Environment? Sorting Out the Causality," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(1), pages 85-91, February.
    2. Kumbaroglu, Gurkan Selcuk, 2003. "Environmental taxation and economic effects: a computable general equilibrium analysis for Turkey," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(8), pages 795-810, November.
    3. Yuquing Xing & Charles Kolstad, 2002. "Do Lax Environmental Regulations Attract Foreign Investment?," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 21(1), pages 1-22, January.
    4. Lee, Hiro & Roland-Holst, David, 1997. "The environment and welfare implications of trade and tax policy," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 65-82, February.
    5. Dessus, Sebastien & Bussolo, Maurizio, 1998. "Is There a Trade-off Between Trade Liberalization and Pollution Abatement?: A Computable General Equilibrium Assessment Applied to Costa Rica," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 11-31, February.
    6. Cole, Matthew A., 2004. "Trade, the pollution haven hypothesis and the environmental Kuznets curve: examining the linkages," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 71-81, January.
    7. Andrew J. Plantinga, 1996. "The Effect of Agricultural Policies on Land Use and Environmental Quality," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(4), pages 1082-1091.
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