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Dynamic sentiment asset pricing model


  • Yang, Chunpeng
  • Zhang, Rengui


Conventional wisdom suggests that the equilibrium stock price is not affected by investor sentiment, and the equilibrium price at an early time is higher than the one at a later time. In contrast to this wisdom, we present a dynamic asset pricing model with investor sentiment and we find that investor sentiment has a significant impact on the equilibrium stock price. The equilibrium stock price, which is affected by pessimistic sentiment at time 0, may be lower than the one at time 1. Moreover, consistent with the reality stock market, our model shows that time varying sentiments can lead to various price changes. Finally, the model could offer a partial explanation for the financial anomaly of high volatility.

Suggested Citation

  • Yang, Chunpeng & Zhang, Rengui, 2014. "Dynamic sentiment asset pricing model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 362-367.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:37:y:2014:i:c:p:362-367 DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2013.11.041

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Malcolm Baker & Jeffrey Wurgler, 2006. "Investor Sentiment and the Cross-Section of Stock Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(4), pages 1645-1680, August.
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    5. Lee, Charles M C & Shleifer, Andrei & Thaler, Richard H, 1991. " Investor Sentiment and the Closed-End Fund Puzzle," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(1), pages 75-109, March.
    6. Baker, Malcolm & Wurgler, Jeffrey & Yuan, Yu, 2012. "Global, local, and contagious investor sentiment," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 272-287.
    7. Hongjun Yan, 2010. "Is Noise Trading Cancelled Out by Aggregation?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 56(7), pages 1047-1059, July.
    8. John Y. Campbell & Luis M. Viceira, 1999. "Consumption and Portfolio Decisions when Expected Returns are Time Varying," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(2), pages 433-495.
    9. Kurov, Alexander, 2010. "Investor sentiment and the stock market's reaction to monetary policy," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 139-149, January.
    10. Campbell, John Y., 2003. "Consumption-based asset pricing," Handbook of the Economics of Finance,in: G.M. Constantinides & M. Harris & R. M. Stulz (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Finance, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 13, pages 803-887 Elsevier.
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    12. Liao, Tsai-Ling & Huang, Chih-Jen & Wu, Chieh-Yuan, 2011. "Do fund managers herd to counter investor sentiment?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 207-212, February.
    13. Yang, Chunpeng & Zhang, Rengui, 2013. "Sentiment asset pricing model with consumption," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 462-467.
    14. Yu, Jianfeng & Yuan, Yu, 2011. "Investor sentiment and the mean-variance relation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(2), pages 367-381, May.
    15. Alok Kumar & Charles M.C. Lee, 2006. "Retail Investor Sentiment and Return Comovements," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(5), pages 2451-2486, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:ecmode:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:231-248 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Luo, Changqing & Ouyang, Zisheng, 2014. "Estimating IPO pricing efficiency by Bayesian stochastic frontier analysis: The ChiNext market case," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 152-157.

    More about this item


    Behavioral finance; Investor sentiment; Sentiment asset pricing model; Time varying sentiment;

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading


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