IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/cysrev/v80y2017icp52-62.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Contextualizing subjective well-being of children in different domains: Does higher safety provide higher subjective well-being for child citizens?

Author

Listed:
  • Uyan-Semerci, Pınar
  • Erdoğan, Emre
  • Akkan, Başak
  • Müderrisoğlu, Serra
  • Karatay, Abdullah

Abstract

According to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, all children are born with civil, political, social and economic rights. However, children's ability to exercise their citizenship rights and practices depend on which country context they live in. Within the limits of this article we want to explore how children's subjective wellbeing is affected by the level of safety provided within the larger country context by using data collected by the consortium of the International Survey of Children's Well-Being. The question we elaborate is whether there is a relationship between the welfare context and subjective well-being of children with respect to different domains, and whether age and gender play a role. We first cluster welfare contexts with selected indicators from international reports among the selected countries of the Children's World Survey from high to low safety provided for children. Then, by referring to the existing literature, we propose six domains for analyzing children's subjective well-being: Health; Material conditions; Education; Risk and Safety; Relationships, and Self-perception. By analyzing each domain we ask whether there is a linear relation between the levels of safety welfare contexts and the subjective well-being of children in different domains and whether this hypothetical relationship exists after controlling for the age and gender of participants. According to our findings, high and medium welfare contexts provide higher subjective well-being in the domains of ‘material’ and ‘risk and safety’. Girls have lower subjective well-being in the low safety welfare context compared to boys. We also find that in the domains of education and relationship, girls' subjective well-being is higher than boys in every safety welfare contexts. Last but not least we also find that the high safety welfare context has a lower average in the self-perception domain and also there is gender difference, girls compared to boys are less satisfied with themselves.

Suggested Citation

  • Uyan-Semerci, Pınar & Erdoğan, Emre & Akkan, Başak & Müderrisoğlu, Serra & Karatay, Abdullah, 2017. "Contextualizing subjective well-being of children in different domains: Does higher safety provide higher subjective well-being for child citizens?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 52-62.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:80:y:2017:i:c:p:52-62
    DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.06.050
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740917305339
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.06.050?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wood, Geof & Gough, Ian, 2006. "A Comparative Welfare Regime Approach to Global Social Policy," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1696-1712, October.
    2. Mark Holder & Ben Coleman, 2008. "The contribution of temperament, popularity, and physical appearance to children’s happiness," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 279-302, June.
    3. Gough,Ian & Wood,Geof & Barrientos,Armando & Bevan,Philippa & Davis,Peter & Room,Graham, 2004. "Insecurity and Welfare Regimes in Asia, Africa and Latin America," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521834193, November.
    4. Radcliff, Benjamin, 2001. "Politics, Markets, and Life Satisfaction: The Political Economy of Human Happiness," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 95(4), pages 939-952, December.
    5. Haridhan Goswami, 2012. "Social Relationships and Children’s Subjective Well-Being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 107(3), pages 575-588, July.
    6. Esping-Andersen, Gosta, 1999. "Social Foundations of Postindustrial Economies," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198742005, Decembrie.
    7. Alexander Pacek & Benjamin Radcliff, 2008. "Welfare Policy and Subjective Well-Being Across Nations: An Individual-Level Assessment," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 89(1), pages 179-191, October.
    8. Toby Fattore & Jan Mason & Elizabeth Watson, 2007. "Children’s conceptualisation(s) of their well-being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 80(1), pages 5-29, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Miriam Raquel Wachholz Strelhow & Jorge Castellá Sarriera & Ferran Casas, 2020. "Evaluation of Well-Being in Adolescence: Proposal of an Integrative Model with Hedonic and Eudemonic Aspects," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 13(4), pages 1439-1452, August.
    2. Mònica González-Carrasco & Lívia Bedin & Ferran Casas & Jaime Alfaro & Jorge Castellá Sarriera, 2023. "Safety, Perceptions of Good Treatment and Subjective Well-Being in 10- and 12-year-old Children in Three Countries," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 18(3), pages 1521-1544, June.
    3. Loreto Ditzel & Ferran Casas & Javier Torres-Vallejos & Alejandra Villarroel, 2022. "The Subjective Well-Being of Chilean Children Living in Conditions of High Social Vulnerability," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 17(3), pages 1639-1660, June.
    4. Svetlana Ignatjeva & Zhanna Bruk & Tatiana Semenovskikh, 2020. "Reflective Component in the Structure of Children’s Subjective Well-Being," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 13(2), pages 609-634, April.
    5. Eunice Magalhães & Maria Manuela Calheiros, 2020. "Why Place Matters in Residential Care: the Mediating Role of Place Attachment in the Relation Between Adolescents’ Rights and Psychological Well-Being," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 13(5), pages 1717-1737, October.
    6. Moreira, Aline Lopes & Yunes, Maria Angela Mattar & Martins, Leonardo Fernandes, 2023. "Children's subjective well-being and the protective role of friendships, school satisfaction and neighborhood in the face of peer victimization," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 155(C).
    7. Mari Corominas & Mònica González-Carrasco & Ferran Casas, 2020. "The Importance of Feeling Adequately Heard by Adults and Enjoying Time with Family in Relation to Children’s Subjective Well-Being," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 13(1), pages 193-214, February.
    8. Sabolova, Klara & Birdsey, Nicola & Stuart-Hamilton, Ian & Cousins, Alecia L., 2020. "A cross-cultural exploration of children’s perceptions of wellbeing: Understanding protective and risk factors," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 110(C).
    9. Jorge J. Varela & Andrés O. Muñoz-Najar Pacheco & María Josefina Chuecas & Matías E. Rodríguez-Rivas & Paulina Guzmán & Maria Angela Mattar Yunes, 2022. "Life Satisfaction, Bullying, and Feeling Safe as a Protective Factor for Chilean and Brasilian Adolescents," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 15(2), pages 579-598, April.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Almudena Moreno Mínguez, 2012. "Gender, family and care provision in developing countries:Towards gender equality," Progress in Development Studies, , vol. 12(4), pages 275-300, October.
    2. Cruz-Martinez, Gibran, 2019. "Comparative social policy in contemporary Latin America: Concepts, theories and a research agenda," SocArXiv ygh8d, Center for Open Science.
    3. Pınar Uyan-Semerci & Emre Erdoğan, 2017. "Child Well-Being Indicators Through the Eyes of Children in Turkey: A Happy Child Would be One Who…," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 10(1), pages 267-295, March.
    4. Erdem Yörük & İbrahim Öker & Kerem Yıldırım & Burcu Yakut-Çakar, 2019. "The Variable Selection Problem in the Three Worlds of Welfare Literature," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 144(2), pages 625-646, July.
    5. Naoki Akaeda, 2022. "The Consequences of Social Policy for Subjective Well-Being: A New Paradox?," LIS Working papers 846, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    6. Tancrède Voituriez, 2020. "The quest for green welfare state in developing countries," Working Papers hal-02876972, HAL.
    7. O'Donnell, Gus & Oswald, Andrew J., 2015. "National well-being policy and a weighted approach to human feelings," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 59-70.
    8. Mónica Ramos-Mejía & Alejandro Balanzo, 2018. "What It Takes to Lead Sustainability Transitions from the Bottom-Up: Strategic Interactions of Grassroots Ecopreneurs," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 10(7), pages 1-20, July.
    9. Jean-Philippe Berrou & Alain Piveteau & Thibaud Deguilhem & Leo Delpy & Claire Gondard-Delcroix, 2021. "Who Drives if No-one Governs? A Social Network Analysis of Social Protection Policy in Madagascar," Working Papers hal-03180029, HAL.
    10. Lucía Macchia & Anke C. Plagnol, 2019. "Life Satisfaction and Confidence in National Institutions: Evidence from South America," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 14(3), pages 721-736, July.
    11. Raphael, Dennis & Komakech, Morris, 2020. "Conceptualizing and researching health equity in Africa through a political economy of health lens – Rwanda in perspective," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 19(C).
    12. Blanchflower, David G & Oswald, Andrew, 2011. "International Happiness," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 39, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    13. Adam Okulicz-Kozaryn & Rubia Rocha Valente, 2018. "Life Satisfaction of Career Women and Housewives," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 13(3), pages 603-632, September.
    14. Makhtoom Ahmed & Imran Sabir & Muhammad Zaman, 2022. "Children’s Perceptions of their Safety and Agency in Pakistan," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 15(3), pages 959-987, June.
    15. Tim Krieger & Daniel Meierrieks, 2010. "Terrorism in the Worlds of Welfare Capitalism," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 54(6), pages 902-939, December.
    16. Yörük, Erdem & Öker, İbrahim & Şarlak, Lara, 2019. "Indigenous unrest and the contentious politics of social assistance in Mexico," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 1-1.
    17. Adam Okulicz-Kozaryn & Lonnie Golden, 2018. "Happiness is Flextime," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 13(2), pages 355-369, June.
    18. Tancrède Voituriez, 2020. "The quest for green welfare state in developing countries," Working Papers hal-02567919, HAL.
    19. Cruz-Martinez, Gibran, 2018. "A Bottom-up picture of Intra-National Welfare Regimes: The case of Marginalised Communities in Puerto Rico," SocArXiv 8c2ex, Center for Open Science.
    20. Miguel Niño‐Zarazúa, 2019. "Welfare and Redistributive Effects of Social Assistance in the Global South," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 45(S1), pages 3-22, December.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:80:y:2017:i:c:p:52-62. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/childyouth .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service. RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.