IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ebl/ecbull/eb-09-00625.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

News aggregators, volatility and the stock market

Author

Listed:
  • Hans Byström

    () (Department of Economics, Lund University)

Abstract

In this paper we employ the news aggregator Google News to demonstrate a strong link between the volatility in the stock market and the amount of news available to market participants. The paper also highlights some other areas, in finance and elsewhere, where news aggregators could be useful.

Suggested Citation

  • Hans Byström, 2009. "News aggregators, volatility and the stock market," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(4), pages 2673-2682.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00625
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2009/Volume29/EB-09-V29-I4-P20.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Berry, Thomas D & Howe, Keith M, 1994. "Public Information Arrival," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(4), pages 1331-1346, September.
    2. Mitchell, Mark L & Mulherin, J Harold, 1994. "The Impact of Public Information on the Stock Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(3), pages 923-950, July.
    3. Ederington, Louis H & Lee, Jae Ha, 1993. "How Markets Process Information: News Releases and Volatility," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(4), pages 1161-1191, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Byström, Hans, 2016. "Language, news and volatility," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 139-154.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Brown, William Jr. & Burdekin, Richard C.K. & Weidenmier, Marc D., 2006. "Volatility in an era of reduced uncertainty: Lessons from Pax Britannica," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(3), pages 693-707, March.
    2. DeGennaro, Ramon P. & Shrieves, Ronald E., 1997. "Public information releases, private information arrival and volatility in the foreign exchange market," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 295-315, December.
    3. Chang, Yuanchen & Taylor, Stephen J., 2003. "Information arrivals and intraday exchange rate volatility," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 85-112, April.
    4. Vlastakis, Nikolaos & Markellos, Raphael N., 2012. "Information demand and stock market volatility," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 1808-1821.
    5. Simonsen, Ola, 2006. "The Impact of News Releases on Trade Durations in Stocks -Empirical Evidence from Sweden," Umeå Economic Studies 688, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    6. M. D. Mckenzie & R. D. Brooks, 2003. "The role of information in Hong Kong individual stock futures trading," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 123-131.
    7. Lazarczyk, Ewa, 2015. "Private and Public Information on the Nordic Intra-Day Electricity Market," Working Paper Series 1064, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    8. Fair, Ray C., 2003. "Shock effects on stocks, bonds, and exchange rates," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 307-341, June.
    9. Simonsen, Ola, 2006. "Stock Data, Trade Durations, And Limit Order Book Information," Umeå Economic Studies 689, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    10. Andersen, Torben G. & Bollerslev, Tim & Cai, Jun, 2000. "Intraday and interday volatility in the Japanese stock market," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 107-130, June.
    11. Antulio N. Bomfim, 2000. "Pre-announcement effects, news, and volatility: monetary policy and the stock market," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2000-50, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    12. Alain P. Chaboud & Sergey V. Chernenko & Edward Howorka & Raj S. Krishnasami Iyer & David Liu & Jonathan H. Wright, 2004. "The high-frequency effects of U.S. macroeconomic data releases on prices and trading activity in the global interdealer foreign exchange market," International Finance Discussion Papers 823, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    13. Chan, Yue-cheong & Chui, Andy C. W. & Kwok, Chuck C. Y., 2001. "The impact of salient political and economic news on the trading activity," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 195-217, June.
    14. Don Bredin & Gerard O’Reilly & Simon Stevenson, 2007. "Monetary Shocks and REIT Returns," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 315-331, October.
    15. Bomfim, Antulio N., 2003. "Pre-announcement effects, news effects, and volatility: Monetary policy and the stock market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 133-151, January.
    16. Alain P. Chaboud & Sergey V. Chernenko & Jonathan H. Wright, 2007. "Trading activity and exchange rates in high-frequency EBS data," International Finance Discussion Papers 903, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    17. Melvin, Michael & Yin, Xixi, 2000. "Public Information Arrival, Exchange Rate Volatility, and Quote Frequency," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(465), pages 644-661, July.
    18. Nofsinger, John R., 2001. "The impact of public information on investors," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(7), pages 1339-1366, July.
    19. Habib Rahman & Hasan Mohsin, 2011. "Monetary Policy Announcements and Stock Returns: Evidence from the Pakistani Market," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 18(2), pages 342-360, December.
    20. Chen, Carl R. & Mohan, Nancy J. & Steiner, Thomas L., 1999. "Discount rate changes, stock market returns, volatility, and trading volume: Evidence from intraday data and implications for market efficiency," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 897-924, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    news aggregator; volatility;

    JEL classification:

    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets
    • C8 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00625. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (John P. Conley). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.