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The Olson - Putnam Controversy: Some Empirical Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • José Atilano Pena López

    () (University of A Coruña)

  • José Manuel Sánchez Santos

    () (University of A Coruña)

Abstract

This paper explores the causal link between associationism and general trust. First we study the principal components that constitute social capital. Then we contrast a structural model identifying the relations between the relevant variables in the so-called Olson-Putnam aporia. The results of the empirical test on the determinants of social capital allow us to conclude that the extension of horizontal networks maintains a direct relation with this form of capital, but not those of vertical type.

Suggested Citation

  • José Atilano Pena López & José Manuel Sánchez Santos, 2007. "The Olson - Putnam Controversy: Some Empirical Evidence," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 26(4), pages 1-10.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-07z10025
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Edward L. Glaeser & David Laibson & Jose A. Scheinkman & Christine L. Soutter, 1999. "What is Social Capital? The Determinants of Trust and Trustworthiness," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1875, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    2. Stephen Knack & Philip Keefer, 1997. "Does Social Capital Have an Economic Payoff? A Cross-Country Investigation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1251-1288.
    3. Alberto Alesina & Eliana La Ferrara, 2000. "The Determinants of Trust," NBER Working Papers 7621, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Knack, Stephen, 2003. "Groups, Growth and Trust: Cross-Country Evidence on the Olson and Putnam Hypotheses," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 117(3-4), pages 341-355, December.
    5. Joel Sobel, 2002. "Can We Trust Social Capital?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(1), pages 139-154, March.
    6. Bjornskov, Christian, 2006. "The multiple facets of social capital," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 22-40, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Groups and information disclosure: Olson and Putnam Hypotheses," MPRA Paper 34628, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Associationism Olson-Putnam controversy Social Capital Trust.;

    JEL classification:

    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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