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Things change: Women’s and men’s marital disruption dynamics in Italy during a time of social transformations, 1970-2003

Author

Listed:
  • Silvana Salvini

    (Università degli Studi di Firenze)

  • Daniele Vignoli

    (Università degli Studi di Firenze)

Abstract

We study women’s and men’s marital disruption in Italy between 1970 and 2003. By applying an event-history analysis to the 2003 Italian variant of the Generations and Gender Survey we found that the spread of marital disruption started among middle-highly educated women. Then in recent years it appears that less educated women have also been able to dissolve their unhappy unions. Overall we can see the beginning of a reversed educational gradient from positive to negative. In contrast the trend in men’s marital disruption risk appears as a change over time common to all educational groups, although with persisting educational differentials.

Suggested Citation

  • Silvana Salvini & Daniele Vignoli, 2011. "Things change: Women’s and men’s marital disruption dynamics in Italy during a time of social transformations, 1970-2003," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 24(5), pages 145-174, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:24:y:2011:i:5
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Letizia Mencarini & Daniele Vignoli, 2014. "Woman's employment makes unions more stable, if the partner contributes to the unpaid work," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 377, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    2. Martin Klesment & Allan Puur & Leen Rahnu & Luule Sakkeus, 2014. "Varying association between education and second births in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(27), pages 813-860, October.
    3. Gøsta Esping-Andersen & Francesco C. Billari, 2015. "Re-theorizing Family Demographics," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 41(1), pages 1-31, March.
    4. Letizia Mencarini & Daniele Vignoli, 2014. "Women’s employment makes unions more stable, if the male partners contribute to the unpaid household work," Econometrics Working Papers Archive 2014_06, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Statistica, Informatica, Applicazioni "G. Parenti".
    5. Anna Matysiak & Marta Styrc & Daniele Vignoli, 2011. "The changing educational gradient in marital disruption: A meta-analysis of European longitudinal research," Working Papers 45, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    6. Letizia Mencarini & Silvia Pasqua & Agnese Romiti, 2014. "Children’s time use and family structure in Italy," CHILD Working Papers Series 27, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
    7. Daniele Vignoli & Elena Pirani & Alessandra Venturini, 2017. "Female Migration and Native Marital Stability: Insights from Italy," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 118-128, March.
    8. Juho Härkönen, 2017. "Diverging destinies in international perspective: Education, single motherhood, and child poverty," LIS Working papers 713, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    9. De Paola, Maria & Gioia, Francesca, 2013. "Does Patience Matter for Marriage Stability? Some Evidence from Italy," IZA Discussion Papers 7769, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. L. Bottazzi & P. Manasse & S. G. See, 2017. "Better Wed Over the Mixen Than Over The Moor? Break-ups of Inter-Ethnic Marriages In Italy," Working Papers wp1098, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    11. Daniele Vignoli & Elena Pirani & Silvana Salvini, 2014. "Family Constellations and Life Satisfaction in Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 967-986, July.
    12. Juho Härkönen, 2017. "Single-mother poverty: how much do educational differences in single motherhood matter?," LIS Working papers 714, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    determinants; educational differences; event history analysis; gender differences; Italy; marital disruption;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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