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Variations in attitudinal gender preferences for children across 50 less-developed countries

Author

Listed:
  • Kana Fuse

    (National Institute of Population and Social Security Research)

Abstract

While a number of studies have examined gender preferences for children by studying behavioral measures, such as skewed sex ratios, sex imbalance in infant mortality, and sibling size/order; attitudinal measures have been analyzed less systematically. Using 50 Demographic and Health Surveys conducted between 2000 and 2008, this paper seeks to advance our understanding of gender preferences in developing countries by examining attitudinal measures cross-nationally. This study’s findings show that, while balance preference is the most common type of preference in the vast majority of countries, countries/regions vary in the prevalence of son and daughter preferences. A preference for sons is not always found; and, indeed, a preference for daughters is shown to prevail in many societies.

Suggested Citation

  • Kana Fuse, 2010. "Variations in attitudinal gender preferences for children across 50 less-developed countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 23(36), pages 1031-1048, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:23:y:2010:i:36
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol23/36/23-36.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kumar, Alok & Kober, Brianne, 2012. "Urbanization, human capital, and cross-country productivity differences," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(1), pages 14-17.
    2. Lamichhane, Kamal & Watanabe, Takayuki, 2015. "The Effect of Disability and Gender on Returns to the Investment in Education: A Case from Metro Manilla of the Philippines," Working Papers 103, JICA Research Institute.
    3. Nunoo, Jacob & Nyanzu, Frederick, 2017. "Dietary pattern, socioeconomic status and child health outcomes in Ghana: application of multilevel analysis," MPRA Paper 80663, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Kenneth Harttgen & Stefan Lang & Johannes Seiler, 2017. "Selective mortality and undernutrition in low- and middle-income countries," Working Papers 2017-27, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    5. Yi Zeng & Linda George & Melanie Sereny & Danan Gu & James W. Vaupel, 2015. "Older parents enjoy better filial piety and care from daughters than sons in China," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2015-012, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    comparative analysis; cross-national research; gender preferences for children;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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