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The timing and partnership context of becoming a parent

  • John Hobcraft

    (University of York)

Registered author(s):

    This paper uses two British birth cohorts, born in 1958 and 1970. There are substantial inter-cohort shifts in timing and context of becoming a parent and gender differences in timing. We use common childhood measures for the two cohorts, pool the two data sets and fit common models. We then ask whether explicit terms for gender or for cohort are required. These can be an unexplained gender or cohort differential or specific differential pathways through measured childhood antecedents. There is considerable support for elements of a common model, but some interpretable gender and cohort terms are also necessary.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol19/34/19-34.pdf
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    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 19 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 34 (July)
    Pages: 1281-1322

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:19:y:2008:i:34
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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    1. Arnstein Aassve & Simon Burgess & Carol Propper & Matt Dickson, 2004. "Employment, family union, and childbearing decisions in Great Britain," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6306, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. R. Raley, 2001. "Increasing fertility in cohabiting unions: evidence for the second demographic transition in the united states?," Demography, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 59-66, February.
    3. Schoon, Ingrid & Sacker, Amanda & Bartley, Mel, 2003. "Socio-economic adversity and psychosocial adjustment: a developmental-contextual perspective," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 57(6), pages 1001-1015, September.
    4. Pau Baizán Munoz & Arnstein Aassve & Francesco C. Billari, 2001. "Cohabitation, marriage, first birth: the interrelationship of family formation events in Spain," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-036, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. John Hobcraft, 2003. "Continuity and Change in Pathways to Young Adult Disadvantage: Results from a British Birth Cohort," CASE Papers case66, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    6. Dawn Upchurch & Lee Lillard & Constantijn Panis, 2002. "Nonmarital childbearing: Influences of education, marriage, and fertility," Demography, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 311-329, May.
    7. John Hobcraft, 2000. "The Roles of Schooling and Educational Qualifications in the Emergence of Adult Social Exclusion," CASE Papers case43, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
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