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When Making Bad Decisions Becomes Habit: Modelling The Duration Of Making Systematically Bad Decisions

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  • Victor DRAGOTĂ

    () (The Bucharest University of Economic Studies)

Abstract

Most part of the models in economics and finance assume that, in general, deciders make good decisions, and bad decisions occur only as exception. This paper analyses some conditions in which bad decisions are made systematically and proposes a model for the estimation of the duration of making systematically bad decisions. Even if individuals are making systematically bad decisions, they can remain in power in many organizations for a long period. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, this paper proves that, in some circumstances, the duration of making systematic bad decisions can be very long.

Suggested Citation

  • Victor DRAGOTĂ, 2016. "When Making Bad Decisions Becomes Habit: Modelling The Duration Of Making Systematically Bad Decisions," ECONOMIC COMPUTATION AND ECONOMIC CYBERNETICS STUDIES AND RESEARCH, Faculty of Economic Cybernetics, Statistics and Informatics, vol. 50(1), pages 123-140.
  • Handle: RePEc:cys:ecocyb:v:50:y:2016:i:1:p:123-140
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ross, Stephen A., 1976. "The arbitrage theory of capital asset pricing," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 341-360, December.
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    4. Samuelson, William & Zeckhauser, Richard, 1988. "Status Quo Bias in Decision Making," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 7-59, March.
    5. Jensen, Michael C. & Meckling, William H., 1976. "Theory of the firm: Managerial behavior, agency costs and ownership structure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 305-360, October.
    6. David Hirshleifer, 2001. "Investor Psychology and Asset Pricing," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(4), pages 1533-1597, August.
    7. Lovric, M. & Kaymak, U. & Spronk, J., 2008. "A Conceptual Model of Investor Behavior," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2008-030-F&A, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    8. Richard H. Thaler, 2000. "From Homo Economicus to Homo Sapiens," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(1), pages 133-141, Winter.
    9. Ballestero, Enrique & Bravo, Mila & Pérez-Gladish, Blanca & Arenas-Parra, Mar & Plà-Santamaria, David, 2012. "Socially Responsible Investment: A multicriteria approach to portfolio selection combining ethical and financial objectives," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 216(2), pages 487-494.
    10. Engle, Robert F, 1982. "Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity with Estimates of the Variance of United Kingdom Inflation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 987-1007, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    decision-making; homogeneous behaviour; rationality; corporate finance; decisional abilities; behavioural finance.;

    JEL classification:

    • G30 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - General
    • L21 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Business Objectives of the Firm

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