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Semi-Nonparametric Estimates Of The Demand For Money In The United States

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  • SERLETIS, APOSTOLOS
  • SHAHMORADI, ASGHAR

Abstract

This paper focuses on the demand for money in the United States in the context of two globally flexible functional forms—the Fourier and the asymptotically ideal model (AIM)—estimated subject to full regularity, using methods suggested over 20 years ago. We provide a comparison in terms of violations of the regularity conditions for consumer maximization and in terms of output in the form of a full set of elasticities. We also provide a policy perspective, using (for the first time) parameter estimates that are consistent with global regularity, in that a very strong case can be made for abandoning the simple-sum approach to monetary aggregation, on the basis of the low elasticities of substitution among the components of the popular M2 aggregate of money.

Suggested Citation

  • Serletis, Apostolos & Shahmoradi, Asghar, 2005. "Semi-Nonparametric Estimates Of The Demand For Money In The United States," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(4), pages 542-559, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:9:y:2005:i:04:p:542-559_04
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    Cited by:

    1. Serletis, Apostolos & Shahmoradi, Asghar, 2010. "Consumption effects of government purchases," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 892-905, September.
    2. Haroon Sarwar & Zakir Hussain & Masood Sarwar, 2011. "A Semi-Nonparametric Approach to the Demand for Money in Pakistan," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 16(2), pages 87-110, Jul-Dec.
    3. Guohua Feng & Apostolos Serletis, 2009. "Efficiency and productivity of the US banking industry, 1998-2005: evidence from the Fourier cost function satisfying global regularity conditions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(1), pages 105-138.
    4. Barnett, William A. & Serletis, Apostolos, 2008. "Consumer preferences and demand systems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 147(2), pages 210-224, December.
    5. Ryu, Hang Keun, 2011. "Subjective model selection rules versus passive model selection rules," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 459-472, January.
    6. Per Hjertstrand & James Swofford, 2012. "Revealed preference tests for consistency with weakly separable indirect utility," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 72(2), pages 245-256, February.
    7. Serletis, Apostolos & Shahmoradi, Asghar, 2008. "Semi-nonparametric estimates of interfuel substitution in U.S. energy demand," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2123-2133, September.
    8. William A. Barnett & Neepa B. Gaekwad, 2018. "The Demand for Money for EMU: a Flexible Functional Form Approach," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 353-371, April.
    9. Barnett, William A. & Usui, Ikuyasu, 2006. "The Theoretical Regularity Properties of the Normalized Quadratic Consumer Demand Model," MPRA Paper 410, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Elger, Thomas, 2002. "The Demand for Monetary Assets in the UK; a Locally Flexible Demand System Analysis," Working Papers 2002:6, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    11. Asghar Shahmoradi & Afshin Honarvar, 2008. "Gasoline subsidy and consumer surplus in the Islamic Republic of Iran," OPEC Energy Review, Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, vol. 32(3), pages 232-245, September.
    12. Hang Ryu, 2009. "Economic assumptions and choice of functional forms: comparison of top down and bottom up approaches," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 55-62, August.
    13. Feng, Guohua & Serletis, Apostolos, 2008. "Productivity trends in U.S. manufacturing: Evidence from the NQ and AIM cost functions," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(1), pages 281-311, January.
    14. Barnett, William A. & Serletis, Apostolos, 2008. "Measuring Consumer Preferences and Estimating Demand Systems," MPRA Paper 12318, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Drake, Leigh & Fleissig, Adrian R., 2008. "A Note On The Policy Implications Of Using Divisia Consumption And Monetary Aggregates," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 132-149, February.
    16. Ryu, Hang Keun, 2011. "Subjective model selection rules versus passive model selection rules," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 459-472.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E17 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • I39 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Other

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