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Money And Growth In A Production Economy With Multiple Assets

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  • KAAS, LEO
  • WEINRICH, GERD

Abstract

We consider a Diamond-type model of endogenous growth in which there are three assets: outside money, government bonds, and equity. Due to productivity shocks, the equity return is uncertain, and risk averse investors require a positive equity premium. Typically, there exist two steady states, but only one of them is stable, both in the forward perfect foresight dynamics and under adaptive expectations. Tight monetary policy is harmful for growth in the stable steady state. These results hold under four different monetary policy strategies applied by the monetary authority. A monetary contraction increases the bond return, reduces the equity premium and thereby capital investment and growth.
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Suggested Citation

  • Kaas, Leo & Weinrich, Gerd, 2003. "Money And Growth In A Production Economy With Multiple Assets," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(05), pages 670-690, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:7:y:2003:i:05:p:670-690_02
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stacey L. Schreft & Bruce D. Smith, 1994. "The effects of open market operations in a model of intermediation and growth," Working Paper 94-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    2. Stockman, Alan C., 1981. "Anticipated inflation and the capital stock in a cash in-advance economy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 387-393.
    3. Stacey L. Schreft & Bruce D. Smith, 1998. "The Effects of Open Market Operations in a Model of Intermediation and Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(3), pages 519-550.
    4. Jones, Larry E. & Manuelli, Rodolfo E., 1995. "Growth and the effects of inflation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 19(8), pages 1405-1428, November.
    5. Frank Hahn & Robert Solow, 1997. "A Critical Essay on Modern Macroeconomic Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026258154x, January.
    6. Bullard, James & Keating, John W., 1995. "The long-run relationship between inflation and output in postwar economies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 477-496, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Schabert, 2006. "Central Bank Instruments, Fiscal Policy Regimes, and the Requirements for Equilibrium Determinacy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 9(4), pages 742-762, October.
    2. Ravenna, Federico & Seppälä, Juha, 2007. "Monetary policy, expected inflation and inflation risk premia," Research Discussion Papers 18/2007, Bank of Finland.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • O42 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Monetary Growth Models

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