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Integrated and Segmented Labor Markets: Thinking in Two Sectors


  • Hatton, Timothy J.
  • Williamson, Jeffrey G.


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  • Hatton, Timothy J. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 1991. "Integrated and Segmented Labor Markets: Thinking in Two Sectors," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 51(02), pages 413-425, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:51:y:1991:i:02:p:413-425_03

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Romer, Christina, 1986. "Spurious Volatility in Historical Unemployment Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(1), pages 1-37, February.
    2. Victor Zarnowitz, 1987. "The Regularity of Business Cycles," NBER Working Papers 2381, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Gorton, Gary, 1988. "Banking Panics and Business Cycles," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(4), pages 751-781, December.
    4. Dominguez, Kathryn M & Fair, Ray C & Shapiro, Matthew D, 1988. "Forecasting the Depression: Harvard versus Yale," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(4), pages 595-612, September.
    5. Schwert, G William, 1989. " Why Does Stock Market Volatility Change over Time?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(5), pages 1115-1153, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andres Rodriguez-Pose & Nicholas Gill, 2004. "How does trade affect regional inequalities?," ERSA conference papers ersa04p478, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Matthew Slaughter, 2001. "Does trade liberalization converge factor prices? Evidence from the antebellum transportation revolution," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(3), pages 339-362.
    3. Knick Harley, 2003. "Growth theory and industrial revolutions in Britain and America," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 36(4), pages 809-831, November.
    4. Rodriguez-Pose, Andres & Gill, Nicholas, 2006. "How does trade affect regional disparities?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(7), pages 1201-1222, July.
    5. Alex Mourmouras & Peter Rangazas, 2009. "Reconciling Kuznets and Habbakuk in a unified growth theory," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 149-181, June.
    6. Jonathan Temple, 2002. "The Costs of Dualism," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 02/532, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    7. Artz, Georgeanne M. & Hoque, Maniul & Orazem, Peter F. & Shah, Urja, 2016. "Urban-Rural Wage Gaps, Inefficient Labor Allocations, and GDP per Capita," ISU General Staff Papers 201609140700001006, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    8. Matthew J. Slaughter, 1995. "The Antebellum Transportation Revolution and Factor-Price Convergence," NBER Working Papers 5303, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. BetrĂ¡n, Concha & Pons, Maria A., 2011. "Labour market response to globalisation: Spain, 1880-1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 169-188, April.

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