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Child Labor and the Factory Acts

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  • Nardinelli, Clark

Abstract

The industrial revolution transformed Great Britain from a nation of agricultural villages into a nation of factory towns. Many of the social changes accompanying industralization aroused the indignation of contemporary critics and later historians. Perhaps the most despised was the employment of children. Edward P. Thompson alleged “that the exploitation of little children, on this scale and with this intensity, was one of the most shameful events in our history.â€

Suggested Citation

  • Nardinelli, Clark, 1980. "Child Labor and the Factory Acts," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 40(4), pages 739-755, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:40:y:1980:i:04:p:739-755_10
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthias Doepke & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2005. "The Macroeconomics of Child Labor Regulation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(5), pages 1492-1524, December.
    2. repec:wsi:wschap:9789812798091_0017 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Martin Rama, 2002. "Globalization and Workers in Developing Countries," Economics Study Area Working Papers 41, East-West Center, Economics Study Area.
    4. Alysa Levene, 2010. "Parish apprenticeship and the old poor law in London," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(4), pages 915-941, November.
    5. Kenneth L. Sokoloff, 1984. "Was the Transition from the Artisanal Shop to the Non-Mechanized Fctry Assoc. w/Gains in Effcny?: Evdnc. from the U.S. Mnfctr. Censuses of 1820 & 1850," NBER Working Papers 1386, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ellen Webbink & Jeroen Smits & Eelke Jong, 2013. "Household and Context Determinants of Child Labor in 221 Districts of 18 Developing Countries," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 110(2), pages 819-836, January.
    7. Adrien Montalbo, 2019. "Education and economic development. The influence of primary schooling on municipalities in nineteenth-century France," PSE Working Papers halshs-02286126, HAL.
    8. Drusilla K. Brown & Alan V. Deardorff & Robert M. Stern, 2009. "The Effects of Multinational Production on Wages and Working Conditions in Developing Countries," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Globalization And International Trade Policies, chapter 17, pages 623-687, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    9. Ravallion, Martin & Wodon, Quentin, 2000. "Does Child Labour Displace Schooling? Evidence on Behavioural Responses to an Enrollment Subsidy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 158-175, March.
    10. Toms, Steven & Shepherd, Alice, 2013. "Creative accounting in the British Industrial Revolution: Cotton manufacturers and the ‘Ten Hours’ Movement," MPRA Paper 51478, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Moehling, Carolyn M., 1999. "State Child Labor Laws and the Decline of Child Labor," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 72-106, January.
    12. Matthias Doepke, 2004. "Accounting for Fertility Decline During the Transition to Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 347-383, September.
    13. Matthias Doepke & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2003. "Voting with Your Children: A Positive Analysis of Child Labor Laws," UCLA Economics Working Papers 828, UCLA Department of Economics.
    14. Korkut Alp Erturk, 2019. "Class Agency Under Conditions of Self-Enforcement: Marx on Capitalists' Common's Problem," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2019_01, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
    15. Cavalcanti, Tiago V. de V., 2003. "Child Labor and School Policies," Revista Brasileira de Economia - RBE, EPGE Brazilian School of Economics and Finance - FGV EPGE (Brazil), vol. 57(4), October.
    16. Brezis, Elise S., 2010. "Can demographic transition only be explained by altruistic and neo-Malthusian models?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 233-240, April.
    17. Rahul A. Sirohi, 2014. "Child Labour, Human Capital Accumulation and Foreign Aid," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 39(3), pages 1-14, September.

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