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Transfer patterns of British technology to the Continent: The case of the iron industry

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  • FREMDLING, RAINER

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  • Fremdling, Rainer, 2000. "Transfer patterns of British technology to the Continent: The case of the iron industry," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(02), pages 195-222, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:ereveh:v:4:y:2000:i:02:p:195-222_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Moe, Espen, 2010. "Energy, industry and politics: Energy, vested interests, and long-term economic growth and development," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 1730-1740.
    2. Broadberry Stephen & Fremdling Rainer & Solar Peter M., 2008. "European Industry 1700-1870," Jahrbuch für Wirtschaftsgeschichte / Economic History Yearbook, De Gruyter, vol. 49(2), pages 141-171, December.
    3. Broadberry, Stephen & Ghosal, Sayantan & Proto, Eugenio, 2008. "Commercialisation, Factor Prices and Technological Progress in the Transition to Modern Economic Growth," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 852, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    4. repec:eee:deveco:v:127:y:2017:i:c:p:379-394 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Domestic Reshufflings, Such as Transport and Coal, Do Not Explain the Modern World," MPRA Paper 18925, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. repec:dgr:rugggd:200255 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Fremdling, Rainer, 2002. "Foreign trade-transfer-adaptation: the British iron making technology on the continent (Belgium and France)," GGDC Research Memorandum 200255, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, University of Groningen.
    8. C Knick Harley, 2013. "British and European Industrialization," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _111, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    9. Broadberry, Stephen & Ghosal, Sayantan & Proto, Eugenio, 2011. "Is Anonymity the Missing Link Between Commercial and Industrial Revolution?," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 974, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    10. repec:dgr:rugggd:gd-101 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Broadberry, Stephen & Ghosal, Sayantan & Proto, Eugenio, 2017. "Anonymity, efficiency wages and technological progress," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 379-394.

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