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Coproducing Urban Governance

Author

Listed:
  • Liz Richardson

    (Politics Department, University of Manchester, UK)

  • Catherine Durose

    (Institute of Local Government Studies, University of Birmingham, UK)

  • Beth Perry

    (Urban Institute and Urban Studies and Planning, University of Sheffield, UK)

Abstract

There are many critiques of existing forms of urban governance as not fit for purpose. However, what alternatives might look like is equally contested. Coproduction is proposed as a response to address complex wicked issues. Achieving coproduction is a highly complex and daunting task. Bottom up approaches to the initiation of coproduced governance are seen as fruitful, including exemplification of utopian alternatives though local practices. New ways of seeing the role of conflict in participation are needed, including ways to institutionalise agonistic participatory practices. Coproduction in governance drives demands for forms of knowledge production that are themselves coproductive. New urban governing spaces need to be coproduced through participative transformation requiring experimentation and innovation in re-designing urban knowledge architectures. Future research in this field is proposed which is nuanced, grounded in explicit weightings of different democratic values, and which mediates between recognition of contingency and the ability to undertake comparative analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Liz Richardson & Catherine Durose & Beth Perry, 2018. "Coproducing Urban Governance," Politics and Governance, Cogitatio Press, vol. 6(1), pages 145-149.
  • Handle: RePEc:cog:poango:v:6:y:2018:i:1:p:145-149
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Beth Perry & Zarina Patel & Ylva Norén Bretzer & Merritt Polk, 2018. "Organising for Co-Production: Local Interaction Platforms for Urban Sustainability," Politics and Governance, Cogitatio Press, vol. 6(1), pages 189-198.
    2. Rikki John Dean, 2018. "Counter-Governance: Citizen Participation Beyond Collaboration," Politics and Governance, Cogitatio Press, vol. 6(1), pages 180-188.
    3. Hugo Sarmiento & Chris Tilly, 2018. "Governance Lessons from Urban Informality," Politics and Governance, Cogitatio Press, vol. 6(1), pages 199-202.
    4. Hendrik Wagenaar & Matthew Wood, 2018. "The Precarious Politics of Public Innovation," Politics and Governance, Cogitatio Press, vol. 6(1), pages 150-160.
    5. Beth Perry & Tim May, 2010. "Urban knowledge exchange: devilish dichotomies and active intermediation," International Journal of Knowledge-Based Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 1(1/2), pages 6-24.
    6. Ostrom, Elinor, 1996. "Crossing the great divide: Coproduction, synergy, and development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 1073-1087, June.
    7. Daniel Silver, 2018. "Everyday Radicalism and the Democratic Imagination: Dissensus, Rebellion and Utopia," Politics and Governance, Cogitatio Press, vol. 6(1), pages 161-168.
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    Cited by:

    1. Koen Bartels, 2020. "Transforming the relational dynamics of urban governance: How social innovation research can create a trajectory for learning and change," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 57(14), pages 2868-2884, November.

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