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Modelling the Effects of Trade on Women, at Work and at Home: Comparative Perspectives


  • Marzia Fontana


The effects of trade on women vary by socio-economic characteristics, sector and country. This paper assesses how well such effects can be captured by a gendered social accounting matrix (SAM) and computable general equilibrium (CGE) model. The model is applied comparatively to Bangladesh and Zambia to highlight how differences in resource endowments, labour market characteristics and socio-cultural norms shape the way in which trade expansion affects gender inequalities. The paper also compares simulation results to other approaches in the gender-and-economics literature, discusses strengths and limitations of the CGE methodology, and provides suggestions for further research.

Suggested Citation

  • Marzia Fontana, 2004. "Modelling the Effects of Trade on Women, at Work and at Home: Comparative Perspectives," Economie Internationale, CEPII research center, issue 99, pages 49-80.
  • Handle: RePEc:cii:cepiei:2004-3qc

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Michael P. Dooley & David Folkerts-Landau & Peter Garber, 2004. "The revived Bretton Woods system," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(4), pages 307-313.
    2. Eichengreen, Barry, 2004. "Chinese Currency Controversies," CEPR Discussion Papers 4375, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Michael P. Dooley & David Folkerts-Landau & Peter M. Garber, 2005. "An essay on the revived Bretton Woods system," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Feb.
    4. Allan H. Meltzer, 1991. "U.S. policy in the Bretton Woods era," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 54-83.
    5. Peter M. Garber, 1993. "The Collapse of the Bretton Woods Fixed Exchange Rate System," NBER Chapters,in: A Retrospective on the Bretton Woods System: Lessons for International Monetary Reform, pages 461-494 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Michael D. Bordo & Barry Eichengreen, 1998. "Implications of the Great Depression for the Development of the International Monetary System," NBER Chapters,in: The Defining Moment: The Great Depression and the American Economy in the Twentieth Century, pages 403-454 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Michael D. Bordo & Barry Eichengreen, 1993. "A Retrospective on the Bretton Woods System: Lessons for International Monetary Reform," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number bord93-1, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Filipski, Mateusz & Aboudrare, Abdellah & Lybbert, Travis J. & Taylor, J. Edward, 2017. "Spice Price Spikes: Simulating Impacts of Saffron Price Volatility in a Gendered Local Economy-Wide Model," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 84-99.
    2. Franck Viroleau, 2015. "The Evolution of Gender Wage Inequality in Senegal Following the Economic Partnership Agreements," EconomiX Working Papers 2015-10, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    3. Frohmann, Alicia, 2018. "Gender Equality and Trade Policy," Papers 1150, World Trade Institute.
    4. repec:bla:devpol:v:35:y:2017:i:2:p:263-287 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Purva Khera, 2016. "Macroeconomic Impacts of Gender Inequality and Informality in India," IMF Working Papers 16/16, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Boeters, Stefan & Savard, Luc, 2013. "The Labor Market in Computable General Equilibrium Models," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.

    More about this item


    Bangladesh; Zambia; Gender; Trade; CGE Models;

    JEL classification:

    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply


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