IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/cem/jaecon/v13y2010n2p181-204.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Multidimensional poverty: Restricted and unrestricted hierarchy among poverty dimensions

Author

Abstract

The increasing interest in multidimensional poverty and well-being analysis has added complexity to the way these phenomena are conceptualized and measured. When multiple attributes are considered, a criterion determining the relative importance attached to the different dimensions has to be adopted. There has not been thus far in the literature a specific attempt to conceptualize the nature of the desired hierarchy among the selected poverty dimensions. The aim of this paper is to take the first step in this direction. We envisage two simple and highly intuitive ways in which such a hierarchical system can be understood, which we label restricted and unrestricted hierarchy. The analytical conditions allowing the incorporation of these into a poverty index are derived and their implications in terms of the understanding of poverty are discussed. An empirical application shows how the choice of the hierarchical scheme for poverty dimensions can lead to opposite conclusions on the poverty trend.

Suggested Citation

  • Lucio Esposito & Enrica Chiappero Martinetti, 2010. "Multidimensional poverty: Restricted and unrestricted hierarchy among poverty dimensions," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 13, pages 181-204, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cem:jaecon:v:13:y:2010:n:2:p:181-204
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/15140326/13/2
    Download Restriction: Online access is restricted to ScienceDirect subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Rolf Aaberge & Andrea Brandolini, 2014. "Multidimensional poverty and inequality," Discussion Papers 792, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. Esposito, Lucio & Kebede, Bereket & Maddox, Bryan, 2011. "Literacy Practices and Schooling: A Case Study from Mozambique," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1796-1807.
    3. Sung-Geun Kim, 2015. "Fuzzy Multidimensional Poverty Measurement: An Analysis of Statistical Behaviors," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 120(3), pages 635-667, February.
    4. Edward Anderson & Lucio Esposito, 2014. "On the joint evaluation of absolute and relative deprivation," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 12(3), pages 411-428, September.
    5. Farah Said & Tareena Musaddiq & Mahreen Mahmud, 2011. "Macro level Determinants of Poverty: Investigation Through Poverty Mapping of Districts of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 50(4), pages 895-911.
    6. Garcia-Diaz Rocio, 2013. "Poverty Orderings with Asymmetric Attributes," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-15, June.
    7. Shatakshee Dhongde & Yi Li & Prasanta K. Pattanaik & Yongsheng Xu, 2016. "Binary data, hierarchy of attributes, and multidimensional deprivation," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 14(4), pages 363-378, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    poverty measurement; multidimensionality; weighting;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cem:jaecon:v:13:y:2010:n:2:p:181-204. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Valeria Dowding). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cemaaar.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.