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Interest rate rules and macroeconomic stabilization


  • Mark Weder


High degrees of relative risk aversion induce indeterminacy in cashin- advance economies. This paper finds that Taylor-style policies can preempt such sunspot equilibria. Specific policy recommendations depend on the fundamentals of the economy, i.e. the empirically true value of coefficient of relative risk aversion.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Weder, 2006. "Interest rate rules and macroeconomic stabilization," Recherches économiques de Louvain, De Boeck Université, vol. 72(2), pages 195-204.
  • Handle: RePEc:cai:reldbu:rel_722_0195

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Stephane Auray & Fabrice Collard & Patrick Feve, 2005. "Habit Persistence, Money Growth Rule and Real Indeterminacy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 8(1), pages 48-67, January.
    2. Richard Clarida & Jordi Galí & Mark Gertler, 2000. "Monetary Policy Rules and Macroeconomic Stability: Evidence and Some Theory," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(1), pages 147-180.
    3. Hansen, Lars Peter & Singleton, Kenneth J, 1983. "Stochastic Consumption, Risk Aversion, and the Temporal Behavior of Asset Returns," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(2), pages 249-265, April.
    4. Jess Benhabib & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe & Martin Uribe, 2003. "Backward-looking interest-rate rules, interest-rate smoothing, and macroeconomic instability," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 1379-1423.
    5. Marc P. Giannoni & Michael Woodford, 2003. "Optimal Interest-Rate Rules: II. Applications," NBER Working Papers 9420, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Charles T. Carlstrom & Timothy S. Fuerst, 2000. "Forward-looking versus backward-looking Taylor rules," Working Paper 0009, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    7. Weder, Mark, 2006. "Taylor Rules and Macroeconomic Instability or How the Central Bank Can Preempt Sunspot Expectations," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(3), pages 655-677, April.
    8. Roger E. A. Farmer, 1999. "Macroeconomics of Self-fulfilling Prophecies, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262062038, July.
    9. Charles T. Carlstrom & Timothy S. Fuerst, 1999. "Forecasts and sunspots: looking back for a better future," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Nov.
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    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy


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