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An Estimate of How Hitting, Pitching, Fielding, and Basestealing Impact Team Winning Percentages in Baseball

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  • Pavitt Charles

    (University of Delaware)

Abstract

Past research attempting estimates of the relative impact of hitting, pitching, fielding, and basestealing on team winning percentage in baseball has been marked by a number of problems, mostly in terms of poor choice of performance measures. The current analysis attempts to perform this task using readily available measures for the years 1951 through 1998. The analysis method is based on a conceptual decomposition of offense and defense into its component parts and then recombinations of the parts in intuitively meaningful ways. The findings imply that offense and defense have about the same impact on team performance than defense, the former is based almost totally on hitting, and the latter divided about equally between pitching and fielding. Division of the sample into time periods with low, medium, and high levels of offense did not substantially change these conclusions.

Suggested Citation

  • Pavitt Charles, 2011. "An Estimate of How Hitting, Pitching, Fielding, and Basestealing Impact Team Winning Percentages in Baseball," Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, De Gruyter, vol. 7(4), pages 1-20, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:jqsprt:v:7:y:2011:i:4:n:13
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stimel Derek S, 2011. "Dependence Relationships between On Field Performance, Wins, and Payroll in Major League Baseball," Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-19, May.
    2. Charles E. Zech, 1981. "An Empirical Estimation of a Production Function: The Case of Major League Baseball," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 25(2), pages 19-23, October.
    3. John Charles Bradbury, 2007. "Does the Baseball Labor Market Properly Value Pitchers?," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 8(6), pages 616-632, December.
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