IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/boe/qbullt/0002.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Household saving

Author

Listed:
  • Berry, Stuart

    () (Bank of England)

  • Williams, Richard

    () (Bank of England)

  • Waldron, Matthew

    () (Bank of England)

Abstract

Household decisions on whether to save or spend play a key role in the outlook for aggregate demand. A range of factors could help to explain the fall in the household saving ratio over the period 1995 to 2007. Declines in long-term real interest rates, looser credit conditions, rising asset values and greater macroeconomic stability are all likely to have reduced the incentive or the need to save. Lower household saving was also offset to some extent by higher corporate saving. Since 2007, the financial crisis and subsequent recession have unwound some of these factors and may continue to lead to a rise in household saving.

Suggested Citation

  • Berry, Stuart & Williams, Richard & Waldron, Matthew, 2009. "Household saving," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 49(3), pages 191-201.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:qbullt:0002
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/-/media/boe/files/quarterly-bulletin/2009/household-saving.pdf?la=en&hash=BB8CF1055EB6F9EFDB575350AA4D518BFD0BA03E
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. James Banks & Richard Blundell, 1993. "Household saving behaviour in the UK," IFS Working Papers W93/05, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Nielsen, Mette & Pezzini, Silvia & Reinold, Kate & Williams, Richard, 2010. "The financial position of British households: evidence from the 2010 NMG Consulting survey," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 50(4), pages 333-345.
    2. Berry, Stuart & Corder, Matthew & Williams, Richard, 2012. "What might be driving the need to rebalance in the United Kingdom?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 52(1), pages 20-30.
    3. Viola Angelini & Peter Simmons, "undated". "Housing Debt and Consumption," Discussion Papers 11/20, Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Cussen, Mary & Phelan, Gillian, 2010. "Irish Households: Assessing the Impact of the Economic Crisis," Quarterly Bulletin Articles, Central Bank of Ireland, pages 62-76, October.
    5. Meng-Na Xu & Ming-Lin Wang, 2015. "Individual perception of accessible social capital and attitude to thrift," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 487-500, September.
    6. Astley, Mark & Giese, Julia & Hume, Michael & Kubelec, Chris, 2009. "Global imbalances and the financial crisis," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 49(3), pages 178-190.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:boe:qbullt:0002. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Publications Group). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/boegvuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.