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International Air Travel and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Proposal for an Adaptation Levy -super-1


  • Cameron Hepburn
  • Benito Müller


Abstract (1287) Cameron Hepburn and Benito Müller Greenhouse gas emissions from international aviation services have been increasing rapidly and are likely to continue to do so in the absence of major policy changes. At the same time, while all countries will experience impacts from climate change, developing countries are the most vulnerable. Significant financial assistance for adaptation is therefore needed for developing countries, but current proposals are inadequate. Solutions to the challenges of both aviation greenhouse gas emissions and climate change adaptation finance are thus urgently required. This paper proposes an international air travel adaptation levy that addresses both problems. Copyright 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Cameron Hepburn & Benito Müller, 2010. "International Air Travel and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Proposal for an Adaptation Levy -super-1," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(6), pages 830-849, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:33:y:2010:i:6:p:830-849

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. van Asselt, Harro & Biermann, Frank, 2007. "European emissions trading and the international competitiveness of energy-intensive industries: a legal and political evaluation of possible supporting measures," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 497-506, January.
    4. Whalley, John, 1979. "Uniform domestic tax rates, trade distortions and economic integration," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 213-221, March.
    5. Krauss, Melvyn B & Johnson, Harry G, 1972. "The Theory of Tax Incidence: A Diagrammatic Analysis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 39(156), pages 357-382, November.
    6. Roland Ismer & Karsten Neuhoff, 2007. "Border tax adjustment: a feasible way to support stringent emission trading," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 137-164, October.
    7. Gary Clyde Hufbauer & Carol Gabyzon, 1996. "Fundamental Tax Reform and Border Tax Adjustments," Peterson Institute Press: Policy Analyses in International Economics, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number pa43, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Pickering & Carola Betzold & Jakob Skovgaard, 2017. "Special issue: managing fragmentation and complexity in the emerging system of international climate finance," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 1-16, February.

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