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Access to Flexible Working and Informal Care


  • Mark L. Bryan


We use matched employer-employee data to explore the relationship between employees' access to flexible working arrangements and the amount of informal care they provide to sick or elderly friends and relatives. Flexitime and the ability to reduce working hours are each associated with about 10% more hours of informal care, with effects concentrated among full-time workers providing small amounts of care. The wider workplace environment beyond formal flexible work also appears to facilitate care. Workplaces do not respond to the presence of carers by providing flexible work, instead there is some underlying selection of carers into flexible workplaces.
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Suggested Citation

  • Mark L. Bryan, 2012. "Access to Flexible Working and Informal Care," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 59(4), pages 361-389, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:59:y:2012:i:4:p:361-389

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gregg, Paul & Grout, Paul A. & Ratcliffe, Anita & Smith, Sarah & Windmeijer, Frank, 2011. "How important is pro-social behaviour in the delivery of public services?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 758-766, August.
    2. Leigh, Andrew, 2010. "Informal care and labor market participation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 140-149, January.
    3. Michaud, Pierre-Carl & Heitmueller, Axel & Nazarov, Zafar, 2010. "A dynamic analysis of informal care and employment in England," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 455-465, June.
    4. Bolin, K. & Lindgren, B. & Lundborg, P., 2008. "Your next of kin or your own career?: Caring and working among the 50+ of Europe," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 718-738, May.
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    1. repec:bla:ecorec:v:93:y:2017:i:302:p:395-419 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Joan Costa-Font & Martin Karlsson & Henning Øien, 2015. "Informal Care and the Great Recession," CINCH Working Paper Series 1502, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Competent in Competition and Health, revised Feb 2015.
    3. Ha Trong Nguyen & Luke B. Connelly, 2017. "The Dynamics of Informal Care Provision in an Australian Household Panel Survey: Previous Work Characteristics and Future Care Provision," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 93(302), pages 395-419, September.
    4. Ciani, Emanuele, 2012. "Informal adult care and caregivers' employment in Europe," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 155-164.
    5. Kaschowitz, Judith, 2015. "Der Einfluss der Pflegeverantwortung von Frauen auf das Arbeitsangebot ihrer Partner: Eine Untersuchung mit dem SOEP," Duisburger Beiträge zur soziologischen Forschung 2015-01, University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Sociology.
    6. Judith Kaschowitz, 2015. "Der Einfluss der Pflegeverantwortung von Frauen auf das Arbeitsangebot ihrer Partner: eine Untersuchung mit dem SOEP," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 780, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).

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