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Cultural Economics and Museum Behaviour

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  • Frey, Bruno S

Abstract

The behavior of art museums is studied by applying economic thinking to culture. Art museums keep a substantial share of their holdings in storage rooms and act in a little enterprising way. It is analyzed why the stock rarely or never displayed is not sold and the proceeds used to buy more suitable paintings, or for restoration, extending showroom capacity and visiting hours, or improving fire and security precautions. It is suggested that giving museum directorates the necessary incentives and independence to employ the resources at their disposition more freely would greatly improve the situation. Copyright 1994 by Scottish Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Frey, Bruno S, 1994. "Cultural Economics and Museum Behaviour," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 41(3), pages 325-335, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:41:y:1994:i:3:p:325-35
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    Cited by:

    1. Frank Micallef & Graham Peirson, 1997. "Financial Reporting of Cultural, Heritage, Scientific and Community Collections," Australian Accounting Review, CPA Australia, vol. 7(13), pages 31-37, May.
    2. Sir Alan Peacock, 2000. "Public financing of the arts in England," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(2), pages 171-205, June.
    3. Juan Prieto-Rodríguez & Víctor Fernández-Blanco, 2006. "Optimal pricing and grant policies for museums," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 30(3), pages 169-181, December.
    4. Elina Lampi & Matilda Orth, 2009. "Who Visits the Museums? A Comparison between Stated Preferences and Observed Effects of Entrance Fees," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(1), pages 85-102, February.
    5. Muzychuk, V. & Khaunina, E., 2015. "Support Mechanisms for Museums in the Economic Crisis (the Example of Major Museums of Europe and Russia)," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 25(1), pages 132-161.
    6. David Maddison, 2004. "Causality and Museum Subsidies," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 28(2), pages 89-108, May.
    7. Silvia Fedeli & Michele Santoni, 2006. "The Government's Choice of Bureaucratic Organisation: An Application to Italian State Museums," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 30(1), pages 41-72, March.
    8. John Ashworth & Peter Johnson, 1996. "Sources of “value for money” for museum visitors: Some survey evidence," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 20(1), pages 67-83, March.
    9. Frey, Bruno S. & Meier, Stephan, 2006. "The Economics of Museums," Handbook of the Economics of Art and Culture, Elsevier.
    10. Frey, Bruno S. & Eichenberger, Reiner, 1995. "On the rate of return in the art market: Survey and evaluation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(3-4), pages 528-537, April.
    11. Michael Rushton, 2000. "Public Funding of Controversial Art," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 24(4), pages 267-282, November.
    12. Bruno S. Frey & Stephan Meier, "undated". "Museums between Private and Public - The Case of the Beyeler Museum in Basle," IEW - Working Papers 116, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    13. Murat Arik & Hulya Varol & Stan McMillen, 2000. "The Economic Impact of the New Britain Museum of American Art Expansion," CCEA Studies 2000-05, University of Connecticut, Connecticut Center for Economic Analysis.
    14. Peter Johnson & Barry Thomas, 1998. "The Economics of Museums: A Research Perspective," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 22(2), pages 75-85, June.
    15. Bruno Frey, 1998. "Superstar Museums: An Economic Analysis," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 22(2), pages 113-125, June.

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