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Doha Development Round: Reaching Beyond Trade Liberalization


  • Sven W. Arndt


While the WTO process of multilateral trade liberalization encounters increasing resistance, in part because the most difficult issues have finally risen to the top of the agenda, market-based forces are contributing to international economic integration. One of the most potent is cross-border production networks. This paper explores the implications of such networks for trade policies and development strategies. It argues that participation in production networks requires trade policy adjustments and domestic reforms that can and should be undertaken unilaterally and that such changes will improve the climate for WTO negotiations. Copyright 2007 The Author Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Sven W. Arndt, 2007. "Doha Development Round: Reaching Beyond Trade Liberalization," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(3), pages 381-394, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:pacecr:v:12:y:2007:i:3:p:381-394

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Anderson, Kym & Pohl Nielsen, Chantal, 2000. "GMOs, Food Safety and the Environment: What Role for Trade Policy and the WTO?," 2000 Conference, August 13-18, 2000, Berlin, Germany 197188, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Kyle Bagwell & Robert W. Staiger, 2001. "Domestic Policies, National Sovereignty, and International Economic Institutions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(2), pages 519-562.
    3. Pray, Carl & Ma, Danmeng & Huang, Jikun & Qiao, Fangbin, 2001. "Impact of Bt Cotton in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 813-825, May.
    4. José Benjamin Falck-Zepeda & Greg Traxler & Robert G. Nelson, 2000. "Surplus Distribution from the Introduction of a Biotechnology Innovation," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(2), pages 360-369.
    5. Terrie L. Walmsley & Thomas W. Hertel, 2001. "China's Accession to the WTO: Timing is Everything," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(8), pages 1019-1049, September.
    6. Falcon, Walter P., 2000. "Globalizing Germ Plasm: Barriers, Benefits and Boundaries," 2000 Conference, August 13-18, 2000, Berlin, Germany 197185, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Anderson, Kym, 2000. "Agriculture's 'multifunctionality' and the WTO," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 44(3), September.
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