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Why Has Occupational Sex Segregation in Turkey Increased since 1975?

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  • Judith Rich
  • Serap Palaz

Abstract

We have used occupational data on Turkey available for the period 1975-2000, to analyse the impact of countervailing legislative effects, economic activity, and cultural attitudes on the sex segregation of occupations. We find that the Turkish labour market is now more segregated than 25 years ago. The recession at the end of the 1970s led to a rise in sex segregation at that time, which has reversed only slowly. Anti-discrimination legislation introduced in the early 1980s and amended in the 1990s may have contributed to the improvement seen over the 1980s particularly in professional occupations. Copyright 2008 The Authors.

Suggested Citation

  • Judith Rich & Serap Palaz, 2008. "Why Has Occupational Sex Segregation in Turkey Increased since 1975?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(1), pages 185-218, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:22:y:2008:i:1:p:185-218
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    References listed on IDEAS

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