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Do Public Subsidies Complement Business R&D? A Meta-Analysis of the Econometric Evidence


  • José García-Quevedo


Analysis of the effects of public financing on private investment in R & D has been the object of numerous applied studies without it having been possible to arrive at a definite conclusion. In this paper the results of a meta-regression of econometric evidence on the relationship between public funding of R & D and private R & D expenditures is presented. After the creation of a data-base including all relevant studies and their results and characteristics, a meta-analysis was carried out to examine whether the characteristics of the applied analysis influence the results and explain the differences in the empirical literature on this subject. Copyright WWZ and Helbing & Lichtenhahn Verlag AG 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • José García-Quevedo, 2004. "Do Public Subsidies Complement Business R&D? A Meta-Analysis of the Econometric Evidence," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(1), pages 87-102, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:57:y:2004:i:1:p:87-102

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    4. John Komlos, 1994. "Stature, Living Standards, and Economic Development: Essays in Anthropometric History," Books by John Komlos, Department of Economics, University of Munich, number 11.
    5. Michael R. Haines & Lee A. Craig & Thomas Weiss, 2000. "Development, Health, Nutrition, and Mortality: The Case of the 'Antebellum Puzzle' in the United States," NBER Historical Working Papers 0130, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Daniel J. Zizzo & Andrew J. Oswald, 2001. "Are People Willing to Pay to Reduce Others'Incomes?," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 63-64, pages 39-65.
    7. Joseph P. Ferrie & Werner Troesken, 2005. "Death and the City: Chicago's Mortality Transition, 1850-1925," NBER Working Papers 11427, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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