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Presidential Election Uncertainty And Common Stock Returns In The United States

Author

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  • Jinliang Li
  • Jeffery A. Born

Abstract

There is substantial evidence on the influence of political outcomes on the business cycle and stock market. We further hypothesize that uncertainty about the outcome of a U.S. presidential election should be reflected in pre-election common stock returns. Prior research pools returns based on the party of the winning candidate, assuming that the outcome of the election is known a priori. We use candidate preference (i.e., polling) data to construct a measure of election uncertainty. We find that if the election does not have a candidate with a dominant lead, stock market volatility (risk) and average returns rise. 2006 The Southern Finance Association and the Southwestern Finance Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Jinliang Li & Jeffery A. Born, 2006. "Presidential Election Uncertainty And Common Stock Returns In The United States," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 29(4), pages 609-622.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jfnres:v:29:y:2006:i:4:p:609-622
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jamal Bouoiyour & Refk Selmi, 2016. "The Price of Political Uncertainty: Evidence from the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election and the U.S. Stock Markets," Papers 1612.06200, arXiv.org, revised Mar 2017.
    2. Smales, Lee A., 2014. "Political uncertainty and financial market uncertainty in an Australian context," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 415-435.
    3. Bryan Kelly & Ľuboš Pástor & Pietro Veronesi, 2016. "The Price of Political Uncertainty: Theory and Evidence from the Option Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 71(5), pages 2417-2480, October.
    4. Goodell, John W. & McGroarty, Frank & Urquhart, Andrew, 2015. "Political uncertainty and the 2012 US presidential election: A cointegration study of prediction markets, polls and a stand-out expert," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 162-171.
    5. repec:bla:irvfin:v:17:y:2017:i:3:p:451-459 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:ove:journl:aid:11278 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Pástor, Ľuboš & Veronesi, Pietro, 2013. "Political uncertainty and risk premia," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(3), pages 520-545.
    8. Ray Sturm, 2013. "Economic policy and the presidential election cycle in stock returns," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 37(2), pages 200-215, April.
    9. Goodell, John W. & Vähämaa, Sami, 2013. "US presidential elections and implied volatility: The role of political uncertainty," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 1108-1117.
    10. Acker, Daniella & Duck, Nigel W., 2015. "Political risk, investor attention and the Scottish Independence referendum," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 13(C), pages 163-171.
    11. Lau, Chi Keung Marco & Demir, Ender & Bilgin, Mehmet Huseyin, 2013. "Experience-based corporate corruption and stock market volatility: Evidence from emerging markets," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 1-13.
    12. Liu, Jiapeng & Tao, Qizhi & Hou, Wenxuan & Zhang, Ting, 2016. "Systematic risk, government policy intervention, and dynamic contrarian investments," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 334-343.
    13. repec:ibn:ijefaa:v:9:y:2017:i:7:p:32-38 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Smales, Lee A., 2015. "Better the devil you know: The influence of political incumbency on Australian financial market uncertainty," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 59-74.
    15. Andrew C. Worthington, 2009. "Political Cycles in the Australian Stock Market since Federation," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(4), pages 397-409.

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