IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/jageco/v57y2006i2p213-220.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Food Choice in an Interdisciplinary Context

Author

Listed:
  • Richard Tiffin
  • W. Bruce Traill
  • Simon Mortimer

Abstract

Reform of agricultural policies, notably the continuing elimination of production‐enhancing subsidies, makes it possible for policies to respond to social issues such as the rural environment and health in future. In this paper, we draw on a Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) research project which is examining the potential for the development of healthy food chains and the implications for human health and the environment. One of the key issues to be addressed is consumers’ willingness to pay for the nutritionally enhanced food products from these new chains, but it is evident that only a partial understanding can be gained from a traditional economics approach. In the paper, we discuss how economists are beginning to incorporate views from other disciplines into their models of consumer choice.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Tiffin & W. Bruce Traill & Simon Mortimer, 2006. "Food Choice in an Interdisciplinary Context," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(2), pages 213-220, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jageco:v:57:y:2006:i:2:p:213-220
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1477-9552.2006.00048.x
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1477-9552.2006.00048.x
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Konstantakis, Konstantinos N. & Michaelides, Panayotis G., 2017. "Technology and Business Cycles: A Schumpeterian Investigation for the USA," MPRA Paper 80636, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Revoredo-Giha, Cesar & Kupiec-Teahan, Beata & Wrieden, Wendy & Davis, Victoria & Milne, Anne & Leat, Philip M.K., 2010. "An Analysis of the Consumption of Sausages in Scotland using Supermarket Data," Working Papers 109402, Scotland's Rural College (formerly Scottish Agricultural College), Land Economy & Environment Research Group.
    3. Theofanis Papageorgiou & Panayotis G. Michaelides & John G. Milios, 2011. "Technology and economic fluctuations in the US food sector (1958-2006): An empirical approach from a political economy perspective," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(2), pages 140-164, January.
    4. Konstantakis, Konstantinos N. & Michaelides, Panayotis G., 2017. "Does technology cause business cycles in the USA? A Schumpeter-inspired approach," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 15-26, December.
    5. Kragt, M.E. & Pannell, D.J. & McVittie, A. & Stott, A.W. & Vosough Ahmadi, B. & Wilson, P., 2016. "Improving interdisciplinary collaboration in bio-economic modelling for agricultural systems," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 217-224.
    6. Silva, Andres & Etilé, Fabrice & Jamet, Gaelle, 2013. "Consequences of the Five-a-Day Campaign: Evidence from French Panel Data," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150426, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jageco:v:57:y:2006:i:2:p:213-220. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0021-857X .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.