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Price Clustering on the Tokyo Stock Exchange


  • Aslı Aşçıoğlu
  • Carole Comerton-Forde
  • Thomas H. McInish


This paper examines price clustering on the Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE). Regardless of tick and lot size, prices ending in zero and five are the most popular. The TSE has no market makers or direct negotiation between traders; therefore, clustering is not explained by collusion or negotiation. Our evidence supports the attraction hypothesis. Clustering also extends to order book depth. There is evidence of strategic trading behavior as traders place orders one price tick better than zero and five to avoid queuing orders at prices ending in these digits. Strategic trading behavior declined and clustering increased when the market became anonymous. Copyright 2007, The Eastern Finance Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Aslı Aşçıoğlu & Carole Comerton-Forde & Thomas H. McInish, 2007. "Price Clustering on the Tokyo Stock Exchange," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 42(2), pages 289-301, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:finrev:v:42:y:2007:i:2:p:289-301

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Smyth, Russell, 2013. "Has political instability contributed to price clustering on Fiji's stock market?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 125-130.
    2. Jeon, Jin Q. & Lee, Cheolwoo, 2015. "A new measure for heated negotiation in the IPO syndicate," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 278-304.
    3. repec:eee:ecolet:v:159:y:2017:i:c:p:145-148 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Jörg Rieger & Kirsten Rüchardt & Bodo Vogt, 2011. "Comparing High Frequency Data of Stocks that are Traded Simultaneously in the US and Germany: Simulated Versus Empirical Data," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 1(2), pages 126-142, December.
    5. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-405 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. ap Gwilym, Owain & Verousis, Thanos, 2010. "Price clustering and underpricing in the IPO aftermarket," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 89-97, March.
    7. Kirsten Rüchardt & Bodo Vogt, 2009. "Comparison of the Stock Price Clustering of stocks which are traded in the US and Germany—Is XETRA more efficient than the NYSE?," FEMM Working Papers 09016, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
    8. Hao-Chen Liu, 2011. "Timing of price clustering and trader behavior in the foreign exchange market: evidence from Taiwan," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 35(2), pages 198-210, April.

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