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The ratification of ILO conventions: A hazard rate analysis

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  • Bernhard Boockmann

Abstract

There are over 180 ILO conventions in many areas of labour law, industrial relations and social security, but they are not ratified universally: for the conventions adopted between 1975 and 1995, the cumulative probability of ratification is about 13 percent 10 years after their adoption. In this paper, the ratification decision is understood as a transition between two states. Using duration analysis, we identify circumstances which are favourable to this transition. For industrialized countries, the ratification of ILO conventions is shown to depend on internal political factors such as government preferences or the power of left-wing parties in parliament. For developing countries, economic costs of ratification have a significant impact. There is no evidence for external pressure in favour of ratification. Among industrialized member states, there is a clear downward trend in estimated ratification probabilities over the last two decades. Copyright 2001 Blackwell Publishers Ltd.

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  • Bernhard Boockmann, 2001. "The ratification of ILO conventions: A hazard rate analysis," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(3), pages 281-309, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecopol:v:13:y:2001:i:3:p:281-309
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    Cited by:

    1. Weichselbaumer, Doris & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2003. "The Effects of Competition and Equal Treatment Laws on the Gender Wage Differential," CEPR Discussion Papers 4015, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Boockmann, Bernhard, 2004. "The Effect of ILO Minimum Age Conventions on Child Labour and School Attendance," ZEW Discussion Papers 04-52, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Guillaume Horny, 2009. "Inference in mixed proportional hazard models with K random effects," Statistical Papers, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 481-499, June.
    4. Thomas König & Bernd Luig, 2014. "Ministerial gatekeeping and parliamentary involvement in the implementation process of EU directives," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 160(3), pages 501-519, September.
    5. repec:elg:eechap:15325_16 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Dursun Peksen & Robert G. Blanton, 2017. "The impact of ILO conventions on worker rights: Are empty promises worse than no promises?," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 75-94, March.
    7. Bernhard Boockmann & Roland Vaubel, 2009. "The Theory of Raising Rivals' Costs and Evidence from the International Labour Organisation," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(6), pages 862-887, June.
    8. Guillaume Horny & Dragana Djurdjevic & Bernhard Boockmann & François Laisney, 2008. "Bayesian Estimation of Cox Models with Non-nested Random Effects: an Application to the Ratification Of ILO Conventions by Developing Countries," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 89, pages 193-214.
    9. Baccini, Leonardo & Koenig-Archibugi, Mathias, 2014. "Why do states commit to international labor standards?: interdependent ratification of core ILO conventions, 1948-2009," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 57665, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. Boockmann, Bernhard, 2010. "The Effect of ILO Minimum Age Conventions on Child Labor and School Attendance: Evidence From Aggregate and Individual-Level Data," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 679-692, May.

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