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Integrating Contested Aspirations, Processes and Policy: Development as Hanging In, Stepping Up and Stepping Out


  • Andrew Dorward


This article proposes a dialogue around a conceptualisation of development as involving three complementary processes: 'hanging in', 'stepping up' and 'stepping out'. These describe different types and scales of structural change in national and sub-national societies and economies, in different sectors within these economies, and in people's evolving livelihoods. The simplicity and strong theoretical, empirical and experiential content of this make it a powerful framework both for interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral, multi-scale analysis of dynamic development processes, and for structuring dialogue about contested aspirations, assumptions, modalities and constraints among development analysts and stakeholders with different interests and paradigms. Copyright (c) The Author 2009. Journal compilation (c) 2009 Overseas Development Institute..

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  • Andrew Dorward, 2009. "Integrating Contested Aspirations, Processes and Policy: Development as Hanging In, Stepping Up and Stepping Out," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 27(2), pages 131-146, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:devpol:v:27:y:2009:i:2:p:131-146

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Joshua C. Gellers, 2016. "Crowdsourcing global governance: sustainable development goals, civil society, and the pursuit of democratic legitimacy," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 415-432, June.
    2. Emily Boyd & Natasha Grist & Sirkku Juhola & Valerie Nelson, 2009. "Exploring Development Futures in a Changing Climate: Frontiers for Development Policy and Practice," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 27(6), pages 659-674, November.
    3. J. Warren Evans & Robin Davies, 2015. "Too Global to Fail : The World Bank at the Intersection of National and Global Public Policy in 2025," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 20603.
    4. William Easterly, 2002. "The cartel of good intentions: The problem of bureaucracy in foreign aid," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(4), pages 223-250.
    5. José Antonio Ocampo & Natalie Gómez-Arteaga, 2016. "Accountability in International Governance and the 2030 Development Agenda," Global Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 7(3), pages 305-314, September.
    6. Gert Spaargaren & Peter Oosterveer, 2010. "Citizen-Consumers as Agents of Change in Globalizing Modernity: The Case of Sustainable Consumption," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(7), pages 1-22, June.
    7. Robin Davies & Jonathan Pickering, 2015. "Making Development Co-operation Fit for the Future: A Survey of Partner Countries," OECD Development Co-operation Working Papers 20, OECD Publishing.
    8. Goran Hyden, 2008. "After the Paris Declaration: Taking on the Issue of Power," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 26(3), pages 259-274, May.
    9. Deepa Narayan & Robert Chambers & Meera K. Shah & Patti Petesch, 2000. "Voices of the Poor : Crying Out for Change," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13848.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tittonell, Pablo, 2014. "Livelihood strategies, resilience and transformability in African agroecosystems," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 3-14.
    2. Elaine Unterhalter & Andrew Dorward, 2013. "New MDGs, Development Concepts, Principles and Challenges in a Post-2015 World," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 113(2), pages 609-625, September.
    3. Giller, K.E. & Tittonell, P. & Rufino, M.C. & van Wijk, M.T. & Zingore, S. & Mapfumo, P. & Adjei-Nsiah, S. & Herrero, M. & Chikowo, R. & Corbeels, M. & Rowe, E.C. & Baijukya, F. & Mwijage, A. & Smith,, 2011. "Communicating complexity: Integrated assessment of trade-offs concerning soil fertility management within African farming systems to support innovation and development," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 191-203, February.
    4. Valbuena, Diego & Tui, Sabine Homann-Kee & Erenstein, Olaf & Teufel, Nils & Duncan, Alan & Abdoulaye, Tahirou & Swain, Braja & Mekonnen, Kindu & Germaine, Ibro & Gérard, Bruno, 2015. "Identifying determinants, pressures and trade-offs of crop residue use in mixed smallholder farms in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 107-118.
    5. Solava Ibrahim, 2011. "Poverty, aspirations and wellbeing: afraid to aspire and unable to reach a better life – voices from Egypt," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 14111, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    6. Sumberg, James & Anyidoho, Nana Akua & Chasukwa, Michael & Chinsinga, Blessings & Leavy, Jennifer, 2014. "Young people, agriculture, and employment in rural Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 080, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. repec:spr:jsecdv:v:19:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s40847-017-0038-y is not listed on IDEAS

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