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Intellectual Property Rights And Economic Growth

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  • WALTER G. PARK
  • JUAN CARLOS GINARTE

Abstract

This paper studies the relationship between intellectual property rights (IPRs) and economic growth for a cross-section of countries for the period 1960-1990. The analysis focuses on effects of IPRs on growth using a quantitative index of IPRs. The paper finds that IPRs affect economic growth indirectly by stimulating the accumulation of factor inputs like R&D and physical capital. The positive effects of IPRs on factor accumulation, particularly of R&D capital, are present even when the analysis controls for a more general measure of property rights Copyright 1997 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Walter G. Park & Juan Carlos Ginarte, 1997. "Intellectual Property Rights And Economic Growth," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 15(3), pages 51-61, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:15:y:1997:i:3:p:51-61
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    1. Milton H. Marquis & Tor Einarsson, 1994. "Optimal disinflation paths when growth is endogenous," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 94-32, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Quah, Danny & Vahey, Shaun P, 1995. "Measuring Core Inflation?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(432), pages 1130-1144, September.
    3. David Mayes & Bryan Chapple, 1995. "The costs and benefits of disinflation: a critique of the sacrifice ration," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 58, March.
    4. Jon Faust & Eric M. Leeper, 1994. "When do long-run identifying restrictions give reliable results?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 94-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    5. Faust, Jon & Leeper, Eric M, 1997. "When Do Long-Run Identifying Restrictions Give Reliable Results?," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 15(3), pages 345-353, July.
    6. Andreas Fischer, 1996. "Central bank independence and sacrifice ratios," Open Economies Review, Springer, pages 5-18.
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