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The Convergence In Product‐Level Relative Productivity Across Provinces

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  • Víctor Martín
  • Asier Minondo

Abstract

This paper uses highly disaggregated data to analyze the convergence process in product‐level relative productivity across Spanish provinces. Over the period 1988‐2013 there is a 53 per cent reduction in product‐level relative productivity differences across provinces. The speed of convergence in product‐level productivity is faster than in income per capita. Provinces that are geographically close, have strong ties and share similar factor endowments become more similar in product‐level relative productivities.

Suggested Citation

  • Víctor Martín & Asier Minondo, 2019. "The Convergence In Product‐Level Relative Productivity Across Provinces," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 71(2), pages 180-194, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:buecrs:v:71:y:2019:i:2:p:180-194
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/boer.12172
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