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Testing and incorporating seasonal structures into demand models for fruit

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  • Carlos Arnade
  • Daniel Pick
  • Mark Gehlhar

Abstract

It is widely recognized that purchases of perishable agricultural products are affected by the seasonal cycles of production. When there are seasonal effects where seasonal buying is not explained by prices alone, the seasonal component can be captured using appropriate dummy variables in a demand model. However, over time the introduction of different varieties and foreign sources of supply in the market may affect the seasonal structure in unknown ways, and because of this, it becomes important to identify and test for characteristics of seasonal structure in demand models. In this article, we set out to measure and test the various characteristics of the seasonal component of fruit demand. We model seasonality in the context of an Almost Ideal Demand System (AIDS) model, where we consider several types of fruit demand in the United States. Copyright 2005 International Association of Agricultural Economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlos Arnade & Daniel Pick & Mark Gehlhar, 2005. "Testing and incorporating seasonal structures into demand models for fruit," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 33(s3), pages 527-532, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:33:y:2005:i:s3:p:527-532
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Feldstein, 1987. "The Effects of Taxation on Capital Accumulation," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number feld87-1, January.
    2. Martin Feldstein, 1987. "Introduction to "The Effects of Taxation on Capital Accumulation"," NBER Chapters,in: The Effects of Taxation on Capital Accumulation, pages 1-6 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Muhammad, Andrew & McPhail, Lihong Lu & Kiawu, James, 2012. "Do U.S. Cotton Subsidies Affect Competing Exporters? An Analysis of Import Demand in China," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 44(02), May.
    2. Arnade, Carlos & Kuchler, Fred, 2015. "Measuring the Impacts of Off-Season Berry Imports," Economic Research Report 229201, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Raper, Kellie Curry & Thornsbury, Suzanne & Aguilar, Cristobal, 2009. "Regional Wholesale Price Relationships in the Presence of Counter-Seasonal Imports," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 41(01), April.
    4. Malone, Trey & Lusk, Jayson L., 2016. "Putting the Chicken Before the Egg Price: An Ex Post Analysis of California's Battery Cage Ban," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 41(3), September.
    5. Mnatsakanyan, Hovhannes & Lopez, Jose & Bakhtavoryan, Rafael, 2017. "U.S. Demand for Fresh Fruit Imports," 2017 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2017, Mobile, Alabama 252760, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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