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Priorities for Boosting Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence for Mozambique

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  • Sam Jones
  • John Page
  • Abebe Shimeles
  • Finn Tarp
  • Sam Jones
  • Finn Tarp

Abstract

type="main" xml:lang="en"> Should policy-makers, including foreign donors, focus employment strategies in sub-Saharan Africa on strengthening access to formal wage employment or on raising productivity in the informal sector? We examine the evidence in Mozambique and show that crude distinctions between formality and informality are not illuminating. The observed welfare advantage of formal sector workers essentially derives from differences in endowments and local conditions. Non-agricultural informal work can yield higher returns than formal work. The implication is that the informal sector must not be marginalized; and raising productivity in agriculture must be accorded a central place in boosting employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Sam Jones & John Page & Abebe Shimeles & Finn Tarp & Sam Jones & Finn Tarp, 2015. "Priorities for Boosting Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence for Mozambique," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 27(S1), pages 56-70, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:afrdev:v:27:y:2015:i:s1:p:56-70
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "Not all that glitters is gold: ICT and inclusive human development in Sub-Saharan Africa," International Journal of Happiness and Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 3(4), pages 303-322.
    2. Simplice Asongu & Mohamed Jellal, 2016. "Foreign Aid Fiscal Policy: Theory and Evidence," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 58(2), pages 279-314, June.
    3. Asongu Simplice & Nwachukwu Jacinta, 2017. "Globalization and Inclusive Human Development in Africa," Man and the Economy, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-24, June.
    4. Asongu, Simplice & Nwachukwu, Jacinta, 2016. "Reconciliation of the Washington Consensus with the Beijing Model in Africa," MPRA Paper 73685, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. repec:liu:liucej:v:13:y:2016:i:2:p:221-246 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2018. "Increasing Foreign Aid for Inclusive Human Development in Africa," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 138(2), pages 443-466, July.
    7. John Page, 2016. "Industry in Tanzania Performance, prospects, and public policy," WIDER Working Paper Series 005, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Simplice Asongu & Sara le Roux, 2018. "Understanding Sub-Saharan Africa’s Extreme Poverty Tragedy," Working Papers 18/012, African Governance and Development Institute..
    9. Asongu, Simplice & Tchamyou, Vanessa, 2015. "Inequality, Finance and Pro-Poor Investment in Africa," MPRA Paper 71171, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Asongu, Simplice & Tchamyou, Vanessa, 2015. "Foreign aid, education and lifelong learning in Africa," MPRA Paper 70240, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. repec:bla:socsci:v:98:y:2017:i:1:p:282-298 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "Foreign Aid and Inclusive Development: Updated Evidence from Africa, 2005–2012," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 98(1), pages 282-298, March.
    13. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1467-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "Rational Asymmetric Development, Piketty and Poverty in Africa," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 13(2), pages 221-246, December.
    15. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "The Comparative Inclusive Human Development of Globalisation in Africa," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 134(3), pages 1027-1050, December.
    16. Simplice Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2015. "Finance and Inclusive Human Development: Evidence from Africa," Working Papers 15/061, African Governance and Development Institute..
    17. Mengistu Assefa Wendimu & Peter Gibbon, 2014. "Labour markets for irrigated agriculture in central Ethiopia: Wage premiums and segmentation," IFRO Working Paper 2014/06, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.

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