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Carbon Sequestration in Forests and Soils


  • Roger Sedjo

    () (Resources for the Future, Washington, DC 20036)

  • Brent Sohngen

    (Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210)


Forests can play a large role in climate change through the sequestration or emission of carbon, an important greenhouse gas; through biological growth, which can increase forest stocks; or through deforestation, which can increase carbon emissions. Carbon is captured not only in tree biomass but also in forest soils. Forest management and public policy can strongly influence the sequestration process. Economic policies can provide incentives for both forest expansion and contraction. Systems that provide prices for carbon sequestration or taxes for emissions can have important effects on emission and sequestration levels. Issues involve carbon additionality, permanence, and leakage. Forest measurement, monitoring, and verification also provide serious challenges. Various economic models are used to estimate the effects of various economic policies on forest carbon stocks. Estimates from the literature of some actual and potential levels of forest carbon are presented.

Suggested Citation

  • Roger Sedjo & Brent Sohngen, 2012. "Carbon Sequestration in Forests and Soils," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 4(1), pages 127-144, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:anr:reseco:v:4:y:2012:p:127-144

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Antonio M. Bento & Lawrence H. Goulder & Mark R. Jacobsen & Roger H. von Haefen, 2009. "Distributional and Efficiency Impacts of Increased US Gasoline Taxes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(3), pages 667-699, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gren, Ing-Marie & Zeleke, Abenezer Aklilu, 2016. "Policy design for forest carbon sequestration: A review of the literature," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 128-136.


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