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Non-Economic and Economic Factors in the Decision to Obtain a Pap Smear: The Case of Women Residents in the State of Florida

Author

Listed:
  • Alexander, Gigi M.
  • Cebula, Richard J.

Abstract

In this unique study of the adult female population in the state of Florida, we found that the percentage of the women 18 to 44 years of age within each county in the state of Florida in 2007 who had received a Pap smear during the past year was a decreasing function of the percentage of women 18 years of age and older who were current smokers, while being an increasing function of the percentage of women 18 years of age and older with an annual income of $25,000 or more, the percentage of adult women under the age of 45 who take a multivitamin daily, the percentage of women age 18 and older who were high school gradu-ates with at least some college education as well, and the percentage of adult women who were classified as leading a sedentary lifestyle. It also appears that the percentage of the women 18 to 44 years of age within each county in the state of Florida in 2007 who had received a Pap smear during the past year was a decreasing function of the percentage of the women 18 years of age and older who were overweight. Based on these findings, certain preliminary general public policy implications are offered in the concluding section of the study.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander, Gigi M. & Cebula, Richard J., 2011. "Non-Economic and Economic Factors in the Decision to Obtain a Pap Smear: The Case of Women Residents in the State of Florida," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 41(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:133339
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. McNamara, Paul E., . "State-level Rural Health Policy," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association.
    2. Richard Cebula, 2010. "The micro-firm health insurance hypothesis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(11), pages 1067-1072.
    3. Fannin, J. Matthew & Barnes, James N., 2009. "Spatial Model Specification for Contractual Arrangements between Rural Hospitals and Physicians," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 39(2), pages 189-211.
    4. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    5. Shields, Martin & Mushinski, David & Davis, Lisa, 2009. "Provision of Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance in Small Businesses: Does Rural Location Matter?," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 39(2), pages 129-147.
    6. Gerhard Fülöp & Thomas Kopetsch & Pascal Schöpe, 2011. "Catchment areas of medical practices and the role played by geographical distance in the patient’s choice of doctor," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 46(3), pages 691-706, June.
    7. Wynveen, Brooklynn J., 2009. "Reasons for Use of Out-of-County Health Care Facilities in the Mississippi Delta," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 39(2), pages 213-225.
    8. Asirvatham, Jebaraj, 2009. "Examining Diet Quality and Body Mass Index in Rural Areas Using a Quantile Regression Framework," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 39(2), pages 149-169.
    9. Barr, Kanlaya Jintanakul & Otto, Daniel, 2009. "Factors Affecting Hospital Choice for Rural Iowa Residents," Staff General Research Papers Archive 13089, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    10. repec:kap:iaecre:v:15:y:2009:i:2:p:226-232 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Jintanakul, Kanlaya & Otto, Daniel, 2009. "Factors Affecting Hospital Choice for Rural Iowa Residents," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 39(2), pages 171-187.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health Economics and Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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