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Trade Liberalisation and the Red Meat Sector

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  • Kerr, William A.

Abstract

Trade liberalisation in the livestock sector is not likely to benefit to any great degree from the trade negotiations on agriculture at the WTO that commenced in the spring of 2000. This is because the major barriers to trade in livestock and red meat are not related to tariffs and other traditional border measures that restrict trade or subsidisation; rather, they are governed by the WTO's SPS Agreement and the GATT's contingency protection provisions relating to dumping and countervailing duties. Negotiations on these issues will have to await a general WTO negotiating round. As SPS and contingency protection questions have many interested sectors, progress is likely to be slow and the prospects for further formal liberalisation remote in the near future. In these circumstances, private sector initiatives to defuse trade problems before they start is a strategy that should be continued and expanded.

Suggested Citation

  • Kerr, William A., 2001. "Trade Liberalisation and the Red Meat Sector," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 2(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ecjilt:23858
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/23858
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hayes, Dermot J. & Hayenga, Marvin L. & Melton, B., 1996. "Impact of Grade Equivalency on Beef and Cattle Trade Between the United States and Canada (The)," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10563, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    2. Hayes, Dermot J. & Kerr, William A., 1997. "Progress Toward A Single Market: The New Institutional Economics Of The Nafta Livestock Sectors," Harmonization\Convergence\Compatibility in Agriculture and Agri-Food Policy: Canada, United States and Mexico; Proceedings of the 3rd Ag... 1997 16888, Farm Foundation, Agricultural and Food Policy Systems Information Workshops.
    3. Roberts, Donna, 1998. "Preliminary Assessment of the Effects of the WTO Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Trade Regulations," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 1(3), pages 377-405, September.
    4. Elmer L. Menzie & Barry E. Prentice, 1987. "Formal and Informal Barriers to Trade in Agricultural Products, Canada—United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 69(5), pages 946-951.
    5. Nick Perdikis & William A. Kerr, 1999. "Can Consumer-based Demands for Protection be Incorporated in the WTO? - The Case of Genetically Modified Foods," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 47(4), pages 457-465, December.
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