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Modelling the marginal revenue of water in selected agricultural commodities: A panel data approach

Author

Listed:
  • Moolman, C.E.
  • Blignaut, J.N.
  • van Eyden, R.

Abstract

South Africa is a water-stressed country where water availability is an important constraint to economic and social development, and will become even more so in the future if this scarce resource is not managed effectively. In order to manage this scarce supply of water, we need to value it. This study focuses on the value of water in the agricultural sector, in particular the marginal revenue of water for six irrigation commodities namely avocados, bananas, grapefruit, mangoes, oranges and sugarcane. A quadratic production function was fitted with an SUR model specification in a panel data study from 1975 to 2002 to obtain marginal revenue functions for each of the six commodities. We found that mangoes are the most efficient commodity in its water use relative to revenue generated (marginal revenue of water equals R25.43/m³ in 2002) and sugarcane the least efficient (marginal revenue of water equals R1.67/m³ in 2002). The marginal revenue of water is not an indication of the true “market” price. Neither is it an indication what the administered price should be. The marginal revenue of water is rather a guideline for policy makers to determine which industries or commodities within an industry can generate the largest revenue per unit water applied

Suggested Citation

  • Moolman, C.E. & Blignaut, J.N. & van Eyden, R., 2006. "Modelling the marginal revenue of water in selected agricultural commodities: A panel data approach," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 45(1), March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:agreko:31732
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Huffman, Wallace E., 1988. "An Econometric Methodology for Multiple-Output Agricultural Technology: An Application of Endogenous Switching Models," Staff General Research Papers Archive 11003, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    2. Michael R. Moore & Ariel Dinar, 1995. "Water and Land as Quantity-Rationed Inputs in California Agriculture: Empirical Tests and Water Policy Implications," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 71(4), pages 445-461.
    3. Michael R. Moore, 1999. "Estimating Irrigators' Ability to Pay for Reclamation Water," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(4), pages 562-578.
    4. Grimble, R. J., 1999. "Economic instruments for improving water use efficiency: theory and practice," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 77-82, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Roberto Roson, 2017. "Beyond Water Stress: Structural Adjustment and Macroeconomic Consequences of the Emerging Water Scarcity," Working Papers 2017:07, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water

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