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The Effect of Child Gender on Parents' Labor Supply: An Examination of Natives, Immigrants, and their Children

Author

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  • Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia
  • Jennifer Ward-Batts

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia & Jennifer Ward-Batts, 2007. "The Effect of Child Gender on Parents' Labor Supply: An Examination of Natives, Immigrants, and their Children," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 402-406, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:97:y:2007:i:2:p:402-406
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.97.2.402
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.97.2.402
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Frimmel, Wolfgang & Halla, Martin & Schmidpeter, Bernhard & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2017. "Grandmothers’ Labor Supply," Economics Series 336, Institute for Advanced Studies.
    2. Kyeongkuk Kim & Sang-Hyop Lee & Timothy J. Halliday, 2020. "Intra-Familial Transfers, Son Preference, and Retirement Behavior in South Korea," Working Papers 202013, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    3. Morrill, Melinda Sandler & Morrill, Thayer, 2013. "Intergenerational links in female labor force participation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 38-47.
    4. Kim, Kyeongkuk & Lee, Sang-Hyop & Halliday, Timothy J., 2018. "The Betrayed Generation? Intra-Household Transfers and Retirement Behavior in South Korea," IZA Discussion Papers 11846, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. David C. Ribar, 2013. "Immigrants’ time use: a survey of methods and evidence," Chapters, in: Amelie F. Constant & Klaus F. Zimmermann (ed.), International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 20, pages 373-392, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Hwang, Jisoo & Lee, Chulhee & Lee, Esther, 2019. "Gender norms and housework time allocation among dual-earner couples," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 102-116.
    7. Mireia Borrell-Porta & Joan Costa-Font & Julia Philipp, 2019. "The ‘mighty girl’ effect: does parenting daughters alter attitudes towards gender norms?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 71(1), pages 25-46.
    8. Alicia Adserà & Ana Ferrer, 2014. "Immigrants and Demography: Marriage, Divorce, and Fertility," Working Papers 1401, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2014.
    9. Ana Ferrer & Alicia Adsera, 2016. "Speeding up for a son? Fertility transitions among Migrants to Canada," Working Papers 1602, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2016.
    10. Neeraj Kaushal & Felix M. Muchomba, 2018. "Missing time with parents: son preference among Asians in the USA," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(2), pages 397-427, April.
    11. María Padilla-Romo & Francisco Cabrera-Hernández, 2018. "The Effect of Children's Time in School on Mothers' Labor Supply: Evidence from Mexico's Full-Time Schools Program," Working Papers 2018-04, University of Tennessee, Department of Economics.
    12. Adserà, Alícia & Ferrer, Ana M., 2016. "Speeding up for a son? Fertility transitions among Asian migrants to Canada," CLEF Working Paper Series 1, Canadian Labour Economics Forum (CLEF), University of Waterloo.
    13. María Padilla‐Romo & Francisco Cabrera‐Hernández, 2019. "Easing The Constraints Of Motherhood: The Effects Of All‐Day Schools On Mothers' Labor Supply," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 57(2), pages 890-909, April.
    14. Timothy Halliday & Sumner La Croix, 2013. "Sons, Daughters, and Labor Supply in Early Twentieth-Century Hawaii," Working Papers 201318, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.

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