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Determining the Impact of Federal Antidiscrimination Policy on the Economic Status of Blacks: A Study of South Carolina

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  • Heckman, James J
  • Payner, Brook S

Abstract

This paper evaluates alternative explanations for the dramatic increase in black employment in South Carolina manufacturing that occurred in the mid-1960s. Black progress in traditionally segregated sectors of manufacturing in operation at the time Jim Crow laws were passed cannot be attributed to tight labor markets, the decline of agriculture, or the growth of education of the black workforce. The only plausible explanation is federal government civil rights and affirmative action policy. For newer industries that entered the state on a large scale after World War II, the growth of skills among blacks accounts for black economic progress. Copyright 1989 by American Economic Association.

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  • Heckman, James J & Payner, Brook S, 1989. "Determining the Impact of Federal Antidiscrimination Policy on the Economic Status of Blacks: A Study of South Carolina," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 138-177, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:79:y:1989:i:1:p:138-77
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    2. repec:ucp:bknber:9780226726281 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. N/A, 1970. "Summary," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 51(1), pages 3-3, February.
    4. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    5. Smith, James P, 1984. "Race and Human Capital," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(4), pages 685-698, September.
    6. Welch, Finis, 1973. "Black-White Differences in Returns to Schooling," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(5), pages 893-907, December.
    7. Orley Ashenfelter & James J. Heckman, 1974. "Measuring the Effect of an Anti-Discrimination Program," NBER Working Papers 0050, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. N/A, 1970. "Summary," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 54(1), pages 3-3, November.
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    10. Richard B. Freeman, 1973. "Changes in the Labor Market for Black Americans, 1948-72," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 4(1), pages 67-132.
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