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Blood and Ink! The Common-Interest-GameBetween Terrorists and the Media

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  • Bruno S. Frey
  • Dominik Rohner

Abstract

It has often been pointed out in the literature that a symbiotic relationship exists between terrorist groups and the media. As yet, however, no formal model has been built based on this issue and only very little empirical research has been done in this field. The present contribution builds a simple game theoretic model, focussing on the social interactions between terrorists and the media. The model has features of a common-interest-game and results in multiple equilibria. After a discussion of the policy implications of the model, an empirical analysis is performed. Using newspaper coverage, terror incidents and terror fatalities data, it is shown that media attention and terrorism do mutually Granger cause each other, as predicted by the model. Moreover, it is explained why terror attacks tend to be “bloodier” in developing countries than in Europe and the United States.

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Paper provided by Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich in its series IEW - Working Papers with number 285.

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Date of creation: Apr 2006
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Handle: RePEc:zur:iewwpx:285

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Keywords: Terrorism; media; common-interest-game; coordination; conflict;

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  6. Matthew A. Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2004. "Media, Education and Anti-Americanism in the Muslim World," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 117-133, Summer.
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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. A climate of terror?
    by David Holmes, Senior Lecturer, Communications and Media Studies at Monash University in The Conversation on 2014-08-11 02:11:42
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Cited by:
  1. Eric D. Gould & Esteban F. Klor, 2010. "Does Terrorism Work?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 125(4), pages 1459-1510, November.
  2. Beckmann, Klaus & Reimer, Lennart, 2014. "Dynamiken in asymmetrischen Konflikten: eine Simulationsstudie," Working Paper, Helmut Schmidt University, Hamburg 147/2014, Helmut Schmidt University, Hamburg.
  3. Friedrich Schneider & Tilman Brück & Daniel Meierrieks, 2010. "The Economics of Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism: A Survey (Part I)," CESifo Working Paper Series 3011, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Axel Dreher & Justina A. V. Fischer, 2010. "Government Decentralization As A Disincentive For Transnational Terror? An Empirical Analysis," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 51(4), pages 981-1002, November.
  5. Athina Economou & Christos Kollias, 2012. "Terrorism and Political Self-Placement in European Union Countries," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 73, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  6. Hendel, Ulrich, 2012. ""Look like the innocent flower, but be the serpent under't": Mimicking behaviour of growth-oriented terrorist organizations," Discussion Papers in Economics, University of Munich, Department of Economics 13998, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  7. Dominik Noe, 2013. "Determinants of the duration and ending of terrorist and other non-state armed groups," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 140, Courant Research Centre PEG, revised 19 Sep 2013.
  8. Meyer Sunniva F., 2011. "Preventing Mass Killings: Determining the Optimal Allocation of Security Resources between Crowded Targets," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, De Gruyter, vol. 17(1), pages 1-37, September.
  9. Dominic Rohner, 2010. "From rags to rifles: deprivation, conflict and the welfare state," IEW - Working Papers, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich 463, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  10. Prieto-Rodríguez, Juan & Rodríguez, Juan Gabriel & Salas, Rafael & Suarez-Pandiello, Javier, 2009. "Quantifying fear: The social impact of terrorism," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 803-817, September.
  11. Raul Caruso & Friedrich Schneider, 2012. "Brutality of Jihadist Terrorism. A contest theory perspective and empirical evidence in the period 2002-2010," DISCE - Quaderni dell'Istituto di Politica Economica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE) ispe0061, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
  12. Roland Hodler & Dominic Rohner, 2012. "Electoral terms and terrorism," Public Choice, Springer, Springer, vol. 150(1), pages 181-193, January.

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