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What Happiness Research Can Tell Us About Self-Control Problems And Utility Misprediction

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  • Alois Stutzer
  • Bruno S. Frey

Abstract

Neoclassical economic theory rules out systematic errors in consumption choice. According to the basic view, individuals know what they choose. They are able to predict how much utility an activity or a good produces for them now and in the future and they can maximize their utility. This implies that behavior reveals consistent preferences. This approach makes it impossible to detect and understand sub-optimal consumption decisions, due to problems of self-control and the misprediction of utility. We propose the economics of happiness as a methodological approach to study these phenomena. Based on proxy measures for experienced utility, it is, in principle, possible to directly address whether some observed behavior is sub-optimal and is therefore reducing a person’s well-being. We discuss recent evidence on smoking and eating habits, TV viewing and commuting choice.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich in its series IEW - Working Papers with number 267.

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Date of creation: Jan 2006
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Handle: RePEc:zur:iewwpx:267

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Keywords: adaptation; individual decision-making; revealed preference; self-control; subjective well-being; utility misprediction;

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  1. B. Douglas Bernheim & Antonio Rangel, 2004. "Addiction and Cue-Triggered Decision Processes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(5), pages 1558-1590, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Bruno S. Frey & Susanne Neckermann, 2009. "Academics Appreciate Awards - A New Aspect of Incentives in Research," CESifo Working Paper Series 2531, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Christian Schubert, 2009. "Is Novelty always a good thing? Towards an Evolutionary Welfare Economics," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2009-03, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Evolutionary Economics Group.
  3. Neckermann, Susanne & Frey, Bruno S., 2013. "And the winner is…? The motivating power of employee awards," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 66-77.

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