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Asymmetric exchange rate pass-through in the Euro area: New evidence from smooth transition models

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  • Ben Cheikh, Nidhaleddine

Abstract

This paper examines the presence of asymmetric behavior in exchange rate pass-through (ERPT) to CPI inflation in 12 euro area (EA) countries. Using a class of nonlinear smooth transition models, we test for asymmetry with respect to the direction and the magnitude of exchange rate changes. On the one hand, we find only 5 out of 12 EA countries showing asymmetric pass-through to exchange rate appreciations and depreciations. Results are somewhat mixed with no clear evidence about the direction of asymmetry. On the other hand, we report strong evidence that ERPT responds asymmetrically to the size of exchange rate changes as a result of presence of menu costs. The degree of ERPT is found to be higher for large exchange rate changes than for small ones in 9 out of 12 EA countries. --

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Economics Discussion Papers with number 2012-36.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwedp:201236

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Keywords: exchange rate pass-through; inflation; smooth transition regression models; euro area;

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  1. Mussa, Michael, 2005. "The euro and the dollar 6 years after creation," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 445-454, June.
  2. Shintani, Mototsugu & Terada-Hagiwara, Akiko & Yabu, Tomoyoshi, 2013. "Exchange rate pass-through and inflation: A nonlinear time series analysis," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 512-527.
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  5. Patricia S. Pollard & Cletus C. Coughlin, 2004. "Size matters: asymmetric exchange rate pass-through at the industry level," Working Papers 2003-029, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  6. Dick van Dijk & Timo Terasvirta & Philip Hans Franses, 2002. "Smooth Transition Autoregressive Models — A Survey Of Recent Developments," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 1-47.
  7. de Bandt, Olivier & Banerjee, Anindya & Kozluk, Tomasz, 2007. "Measuring Long-Run Exchange Rate Pass-Through," Economics Discussion Papers 2007-32, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  8. Ben Cheikh, Nidhaleddine, 2012. "Non-linearities in exchange rate pass-through: Evidence from smooth transition models," MPRA Paper 39258, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Eiji Fuji & Jeannine Bailliu, 2004. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through and the Inflation Environment in Industrialized Countries: An Empirical Investigation," Computing in Economics and Finance 2004 135, Society for Computational Economics.
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  11. Salvador Gil-Pareja, 2000. "Exchange rates and European countries’ export prices: An empirical test for asymmetries in pricing to market behavior," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 136(1), pages 1-23, March.
  12. Jiawen Yang, 2007. "Is exchange rate pass-through symmetric? Evidence from US imports," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(2), pages 169-178.
  13. Valerie Herzberg & George Kapetanios & Simon Price, 2003. "Import prices and exchange rate pass-through: theory and evidence from the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 182, Bank of England.
  14. Campa, José Manuel & Goldberg, Linda S, 2004. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through into Import Prices," CEPR Discussion Papers 4391, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. Reginaldo P. Nogueira Junior & Miguel Leon-Ledesma, 2008. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through Into Inflation: The Role of Asymmetries and NonLinearities," Studies in Economics 0801, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
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